Dining at Burning Man

What do you eat and drink on the playa? Share ideas, recipes and advice here.
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ThePikey
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Post by ThePikey » Mon Apr 25, 2005 6:16 pm

Martiansky wrote:Anyone use those small propane gas grills you can buy for around $15 for making steaks and kabobs and such?
I'm not sure if it was $15, but our camp used a small stove and a small grill, both propane, and they worked swell. Bring an extra tank or two, depending on how much cooking you'll be doing. (They're pretty cheap)

Best thing about them is - they're compact. No messing with charcoal/lighter fluid/any of that nonsense. Just one small handy little cannister. And they're clean, too so there's no moop - just gotta schlepp out the empties when you're done.

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Post by robotland » Tue Apr 26, 2005 5:13 am

And you can improvise an oven with some stiff wire and foil. Slip over the burner (not YOU- the STOVE burner!) and make sure to vent.
Howdy From Kalamazoo

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AntiM
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Post by AntiM » Tue Apr 26, 2005 7:01 am

We have a little butane camp stove. Perfect for coffee and hot water, very compact and the little cannisters are only a couple bucks. I guess we could grill stuff on it if we wanted to do so. We took our regular propane grill a couple years, and it worked well too, it is just too big.

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Post by hunter S » Wed Apr 27, 2005 4:33 pm

I know this is a little off base but....I can't help wondering??? why their isn't a camp kitchen or many group kitchens. part of our contribution last year & this year is to provide a community kitchen. as many burners come from long distances & basic cooking supply's are costly to purchase on arrivel (i.e. flying into Reno) it seems to me a few kitchens spred through the BRC kinda a joint volenteer thing. 40,000 burners, each bringing say one collman, OK maybe not EVERONE brings a stove. but I think you get my drifft?? Is it possible ? soup kichens in BRC just a thought.
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unjonharley
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Post by unjonharley » Wed Apr 27, 2005 4:51 pm

Hhunter said<snip>

~
every one has there cross to bare. Getting to BM with enougt to keep you is one for everyone. I can and have put a camp in a 30 inch duffle. Then hopped a plane across country and set 11 camps on the way back. All I picked up extra were goodies. I'm a munch mouth. On the playa I bring a lot of different foods just for my comfort. The winds were so bad in 01 it drove me to micro camp again. This year I plan to micro camp except for cooler stuff. Less camp, more time for fun. Always bring some for some one else.
I'm the contraptioneer your mother warned you about.

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AntiM
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Post by AntiM » Wed Apr 27, 2005 6:28 pm

Random negative thoughts: large camp kitchens or soup kitchens are expensive, time consuming, and if they come to exist, people will demand to be fed, and demand to be fed what they consider edible. There could potentially be thousands of people depending on a soup kitchen for meals at all times of the night and day! If your volunteers flake out, if your supplies ran out, if you fell short of your fund raising goals, there'd be people left hungry. Big vamps often do have communal kitchens, but the monies, work shifts and clean up are addressed beforehand by camp members.

Feeding folks on a volunteer basis is a great gift; creating an expectation of food provided for folks is contrary to the self reliance ideal.

Or, hey it is just a freakin' camping trip, who says you need hot meals?

(My, my, aren't I the pissy one lately? How's yer cornflakes?)

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Isotopia
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Post by Isotopia » Wed Apr 27, 2005 7:33 pm

(My, my, aren't I the pissy one lately? How's yer cornflakes?)
I'm thinking your post was pretty well said.

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AntiM
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Post by AntiM » Thu Apr 28, 2005 6:01 am

Thank you.

(hint: avoid the Cobb Salad. I pissed in it too)

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Well taken

Post by EvilDustBooger » Thu Apr 28, 2005 6:38 am

AntiM wrote:

Feeding folks on a volunteer basis is a great gift; creating an expectation of food provided for folks is contrary to the self reliance ideal.
Thanks for those words AntiM
We are going to put up a sign on our noodle kitchen to the effect:

"We are not your MAMA.
We are happy to share
with you when we are
OPEN
DO NOT expect us to
feed you when we are
CLOSED
thank you
now git to the back of the line"

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unjonharley
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Post by unjonharley » Thu Apr 28, 2005 7:23 am

AntiM wrote:Thank you.

(hint: avoid the Cobb Salad. I pissed in it too)


~
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Post by AntiM » Thu Apr 28, 2005 8:33 am

Squirt bottle. I hate getting spritzed in the face.

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Post by hunter S » Thu Apr 28, 2005 9:33 am

Ok, I see your point :roll: although I wasn't thinking food just food prep areas. just seems a redundent mis-use of recorces, but over cordination and managment would be a drag. Thanks all
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"Dining at the burn."

Post by XS » Thu Apr 28, 2005 9:55 am

There's a lovely restaurant row, where you can anything under the sun. From Thai, to Indian, Tex-mex, to Ramen. No wait that's all in my fantasy filled mind. Perhaps too much sun.

Thank you for the Personal Responsiblility reminder AntiM. I think it's great to plan nice meals for oneself and campmates. But even then, some less than happy campers gradually become pissy, and disatisfied with food offerings. Perhaps they're not adjusting well, or maybe they contribute any effort to the meal prep and have come to expect gourmet perfection. We're on a camping trip kids!

Keep in mind your appetite will taper off by the end of the week! Energy levels will drop and you'll be less likely whip up the deluxe grits. Eat heartily at the begining of the week. By sunday you'll be happy with instant oatmeal or a can of spaghetti O's.

Bon appetit mes petits enfants!
Too much is never enough.

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Post by safetythird » Thu Apr 28, 2005 9:57 am

A couple things we were really happy we brought:

(Some of these may seem like too much cooking fuss but for us it was nothing.)

Pre-cooked rice and beans. Cooked at home and thrown into a tupperware container. Surprisingly nutritious and easy to heat up (Ok so we have a micro in the RV but in a pan over low heat would work too) Throw a bit of each in a flour tortilla, add a little cheese and a splash of salsa. The only clean up was the empty tupperware.

Playa Chili. Precooked/seasoned some ground beef and put it in a ziplock. Measured out and put chili spices (use your own recipe :)) in another ziplock. Pour cans of pinto beans, kidney beans, and other veggies into a pot (drain the bean juices first, your tent mate will appreciate this). Mix in the meat and spices and simmer for 20 minutes. Super easy and filling and if you make your chili hot like I do, kicks serious butt as a chilly evening meal. Really warms you up from the inside. Great for feeding the masses.

But wait...... There's More.

Mac n cheese with tuna. As simple as it sounds and gives you a nice protein to carb ratio. We planned to eat it later in the week but the cravings got the best of us. It left us content, re-energized and ready to party like rock stars. Gotta bring more next year.

Starbucks double shots. Thought we brought too many but went through them like mad. Perfect pick me up any time of day.

Gatoraid, lots of it. 'Nuff said.

Otter Pops. My dry ice let me keep em frozen until Saturday. Very refreshing daytime treat. Lots of smiling faces near the portos and at center camp.

Bloody Mary mix and vodka. MmMmM.. breakfast of champions.

Jerky, nuts and dried banana chips were highly snacky. Could have used some sweet snacks too, maybe some good chocolate this year.

This year we will bring way more mixers and less booze. We couldn't give away our booze but every bar needed mixers.

Those small weber gas grills kick ass. I've had one for 10 years and take it on every camping trip. You can fit 3 of the propane bottles under the lid for transport. I've cooked everything from skirt steaks to tri-tip on it. Maybe not as flavorful as charcoal but a hell of a lot easier to deal with.

S3

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Post by gnostikoi » Thu May 05, 2005 10:51 pm

My favorites:
Dried fruit
Nuts
Jerky
Miso soup packets
Tasty Bites (which I ended up eating cold - the only thing I heated last year was water for above miso soup)
Little boxes of soy milk (no need to keep cold)
Powdered Gatorade

I didn't take a cooler last year and don't plan to bring one this year - it's much simpler that way. I don't know if it's the heat, the altitude, the excitement, or a combination of all three, but I don't get very hungry on the playa.

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Post by 5x5 » Fri May 06, 2005 8:40 am

i was at the local indian grocer last week, and was stocking up on some of their packaged meals - i think they may be great to take! (first timer here) no refridgeration required, precooked, heat and serve. (in the sun, maybe even skip the heating!)

and at $1.20 each it's a bargain.

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Post by rocnjbarr » Sun May 15, 2005 8:17 pm

I just bring a double wide fridge and pack all I can to surprise people who come to eat at my camp. Everyone loves the fresh seafood chowder, salmon steaks Orgasm Omelette etc etc Cold beer, ice cream, daquiris all go over well!
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jmdinn
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Introduce yourself to your kitchen

Post by jmdinn » Mon May 16, 2005 2:50 pm

There's countless cheap, quick, easy ways to survive a strenuous, energetic week on the playa. But I didn't go to prove I could survive, I went to have an amazing time. For me, that includes having amazing food. With only a little more thought and prep, you can do a HELL of a lot better for yourself (and your neighbors) than Spaghetti O's, MRE's and chilli mac.

Obviously, some folks would rather have more time running around and spend less time on what they feed themselves. And that's totally valid. But if you're like me, just the idea of eating 15 consecutive meals from a can gives you indegestion. We were on playa Monday to Monday, ate fantastically all week and only cooked twice (excepting the fresh coffee we brewed each morning for us and neighbors).

Here's my $0.02:

#1. Bring some fresh exotics to eat and distribute when you first arrive (especially if you plan to arrive mid to late in the week). By Wednesday, gate workers, greeters and your neighbors have nearly forgotten the sensual joys of fresh sushi and cold beer.

#2. If you just HAVE to bring fresh mellon/pineapple, clean and chop it BEFORE you leave.

#3. You can cook and freeze almost anything. Cleaning pots and plates in a dust storm is nearly as impossible as cleaning them AFTER a dust storm. We froze servings in zip-locs so we could just pull out a ziploc, eat the contents and throw away the bag.

#4. Salad-In-A-Bag types things that are available in the refridgerated produce section are packaged in a way that prevents the greens from wilting for DAYS (bag filled with N2 maybe?). They take up space, but if you have the room, you can have fresh mesculun greens and spinach salad on Sunday morning.

Menu highlights:
---> Cabernet-roasted cloves of elephant garlic served on toasted points of French bread
---> Grilled breasts of boneless chicken slathered in spicy-sweet Thai peanut sauce
---> Olive tappenade and roasted-pepper marinara dipped with bagel chips
---> Pineapple-soy-ginger marinated tips of chicken breast

Last tip: Consume food and water in the same way; when it's time, not when your body tells you to. If you always wait until you're hungry/thirsty, you won't give yourself the fuel you need to make it through the week.

Live well!!
=)
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Post by diane o'thirst » Thu May 19, 2005 4:37 pm

Regarding community kitchens:
Wouldn't undertake it unless you have someone in charge that has actual practical in the field mobile kitchen experience, as in they went to culinary school and went into field catering after graduation. The health department patrols and holds you to the same standards as the pros do. I also wouldn't do it unless I had a pool of non-flakey volunteers/prep people who are willing to go through the (not as hard as you think) process of kitchen hygeine and maintenance that the health department requires.

Second: Know that you <i>will</i> run into dietary exclusions. Some will be legit like anaphylactic allergies and diabetes, most will be something silly like "I read this really good book that told me I shouldn't eat [such and such]."

Your best bet would be to concentrate on gifting food that is considered a treat, like chai or smoothies or chocolate (always a good bet). Look at the food-gifting camps' offerings: the ice cream truck, Nub Chai, Tuna Guys, Happy Birthday Virgo. I brought an adobe oven twice and they had one at the very first Playa burn — hard to poison anyone with bread but then you're gonna run into the "wheat is evil" crowd. Please do yourself a favour and <b>do not</b> attempt a gluten-free pizza. It will crash and burn in a spate of abject misery and you will cry. Tell the gluten-frees to deal with it.
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Post by robotland » Fri May 20, 2005 7:10 am

I just taste tested Thai Kitchen brand instant rice-noodle soup....(Lemon grass and chili flavor.) Good. A little bland, but that's fixable.

Knorr Spanish rice, also "instant"....not bad. ALL Knorr soups are good.

Been reading the recipe book that came with my Lil' Chief Smoker... This should be a culinarily interesting weekend. Best yard sale find this year, so far!
Howdy From Kalamazoo

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Post by missmann » Fri May 20, 2005 7:56 am

Last year, my travel mate and I ate pretty well- Tasty Bites Indian Curries were especially good because they were pretty filling, very flavorful, fairly economical, low on packaging, and easy to prepare. If we wanted to eat while it was still light we'd just set them in the sun to heat.
Other things we took: big bag of brown rice, all-in-one pancake mix, bananas, nutella, granola, raisins and other dried fruit, apples, canned vegetarian chili, oatmeal. Somehow we managed to buy all of our food and water for the week for like $70 (and we took way too much water).
About community kitchens: I have experienced a not-so organised one and heard about others that worked out fine. The not so organised one had a really awesome set up, but the group of people using it were only cooking individual meals, making for a ton of dishes and it seemed like people had a hard time being motivated to clean up after theirselves. In addition to the food items that people brought for themselves, there were quite a few donated snacks and condiments, though why anybody would bring a giant glad garbage bag full of saltines is beyond me (and they were all wrapped in packs of two- way too much packaging). Kitchens that I have heard worked well require a ton of planning and mad organization ie) one person sorta acts as a kitchen manager: does the meal planning, writes a menu for the week and gets recipes together. Then everything is costed out, including snacks and water and a price per person is arranged. There is a schedule for cooking and cleaning duties and the hot group meals are cooked at approximately the same time each day. If someone doesn't show up to eat, their food is put into a container and set aside.
Travel arrangements will be different this year- may be looking to join a camp that needs help with cooking. My travel partner for this year and myself are both apprentice chefs and we have been known to rustle up some pretty tasty potluck items...

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Post by redd_18235 » Fri May 20, 2005 10:42 pm

I think the military got it right with the camping food. They're called Meals-Ready-to-Eat or MRE's for short. Any army surplus store has them for sale at about $10 to $15 each. It comes with a main course in a bag which self heats to boiling temp (you gotta see it to believe it). It also comes with an oversized cracker and either peanut butter or fudge. Plus a small candy like a jolly rancher, utencels, very tiny bottle of hot sauce, salt n pepper, and other condiments. This all packs very well but the down side is that it generates a lot of garbage i.e. everything is individually wrapped in plastic. If you can contain the mess and can afford them, get them. They're surprizingly taisty.
"The Gods will not do for us what we can do for ourselves. The surprize is just how much that is."

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theCryptofishist
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Post by theCryptofishist » Mon May 23, 2005 8:42 am

I don't really like MRE's and they are pretty american meat and potatoes in conception. Also higher calorie than you may need in the desert. Many people (and the mrFishist among them) find them a very good option.
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geekster
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Post by geekster » Mon May 23, 2005 9:08 am

Take a little bit of canned stuff just in case. Just in case you run out of ice and the stuff spoils, just in case your cooler gets left open and stuff spoils, etc. Havign a few cans of something around might make a big difference. There are a lot of meals out on the market now in cardboard tubs like TV dinners come in now that don't require refrigeration too. And you don't need to get fancy either. A few cans of beef stew or corned beef hash and some canned fruit will get you by in a jam. It isn't elegant cuisine but you can survive on it, it won't go bad, and it will be there rain or shine. So stash a few cans of something here and there just in case. Just don't lose the can opener.

Also, what is going to appeal to people is going to greatly depend on the weather. If it is blazing hot and not a breeze to be had, people are going to want to eat light and cool. Cool gazpacho might be welcome. If it has been cloudy and rainy and windy for the past few days, people are going to want hotter, heartier stuff. Same with drinks. Cold stuff in the day, hot at night. If it's been raining for three days, the Otter pops are what you give to yahoos. Your friends will get a hot toddy.

Also, keep in mind that the weather can be *much* different at night. People often prepare for the desert heat but are suprised by nightime temps in the 30's by dawn. Just understand that it isn't always hot in the daytime either and be prepared for it. Ask youself ... can we feed people if we have two or three days of wind and rain? It has happened. 1998 had rain off and on for most of the event.
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Post by Lysergic » Wed May 25, 2005 5:16 am

Anyone else had experiences with MRE's on the playa? I was able to find some made in 2004 for $5-7/each in a case of 12 on ebay. Just add water!

Hell if the military issues the stuff in wartime situations...I'm guessing it'll work great battling against the harsh and torturous desert...Not to mention they all come packaged with hand cleaner, matches, chewing gum, salt, coffee/tea, toilet tissue, and flameless chemical heater! I've had a few before and I thought they were pretty good,
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Post by EvilDustBooger » Wed May 25, 2005 7:06 am

MRE`s are not my idea of a good choice for the playa.....although there is the novelty of having several condiments included, the flavor....or lack of...makes it better for being in a war zone, where fresher foods are un-available. There will even be tastier/cheaper/healthier foods available with the same type packaging in Indo/Pakistani & asian stores ....and your grocers have meals that require no refrigeration. The MRE, though it packs plenty of calories, and abit of nutrition....lacks good taste.
You won`t find many GI`s relishing an MRE when they aren`t in the field....of course, there`s probably a few that can`t wait to chew in to thier "ham slice".....

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Post by theCryptofishist » Wed May 25, 2005 8:42 am

If you do go with the MRE, make sure the toilet paper's one play if you plan to use it at the JotS.
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Post by jbelson » Wed May 25, 2005 2:18 pm

I planned out every meal ahead of time last year. I did as much pre cooking as possible to and just sealed stuff in bags.
Had a nice little salad almost every nite. I took sip lock bags and put one meals lettuce in each bag and sealed. That way the lettuce that was used later in the week was still fresh because I didn't keep opening the bag.
Egg beaters are also the way to go, easy to store and easy to pour. I also marinated a bunch of meats and put in seperate bags for the different meals and cooked on a coleman portable BBQ. They're lightweight and easy to use, just give it 10 minutes to heat up good. I also roasted a bunch of Passilla peppers befor I left and put into little baggies to add to eggs. They give so much flavor.
Things I loved:
Quessadillas-they're pretty easy to do and I use the resealable cheese in a bag.
Pre-cooked sausage patty's (brown and serve), sooo yummy.
Famous amos cookies-the best cookie on the market.
Gatroraide-they really cure a hangover
Kettle brand chips, they are soo good.
Pita crisps and humous, a really tasty snack.
Marinated tri-tip. You can get it cut into strips and it cooks up pretty fast and is super yummy.

The only thing I hesitate to bring again is bacon. Too much grease left over.
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Post by diane o'thirst » Wed May 25, 2005 3:54 pm

MRE's are $10 - $15??!?!?! :shock:
'Kin ell, that's a gut-busting lay-down-and-digest-in-your-sleep meal at my local fish house or BBQ shack. You can get loaded up on Mongolian for less than that. Heck, I can get a salmon fillet at Costco, smoke it at home and pack it with a vacuum foodsaver for the same price. One day's supply of MREs for two people would fill your gas tank.
Feh. Our "buy-in" to the Opera Camp kitchen was $60 and we had fresh gourmet anything at all twice daily.
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Post by jbelson » Wed May 25, 2005 4:16 pm

I think the kitchen "buy-in" is the best way to go. Everyone eats great for a fraction of the cost. SOme eat more than others, but then those others dont eat as much as something else. People complain, but when you go your own way, you end up spending just as much and dont eat as good.
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