Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Ideas, advice, tips, and tricks regarding shelter, shade, tents, and camping. Yes, this includes RV's too.
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EasySunshine
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Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by EasySunshine » Sun Aug 11, 2019 10:28 am

Hello beautiful people!

In preparation of going back home this year, as well as making an investment for future burns, I've decided to finally invest in a good shelter system. How is the shiftpod2? They say you can travel/fly with it easily but I've heard conflicting reports about that. I'm based in Miami and will be flying into vegas the 22nd to meet up with the gang and ride up to reno, then BRC the next day. Would a shiftpod2 be conducive to traveling? Or more of a pain in the ass? What are other good alternatives particularly for easy traveling? Kodiak? Dream House? Monkey Hut?

Thanks a million for the advice in advance! <3

Love & light to all of you & see you at home!

Burning Regards,
Easy

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Token
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Token » Sun Aug 11, 2019 10:50 am

All the stuff you mentioned in your post ...

Large and hard to ship.

Shiftpod, Kodiak, Springbar ... all luxury type tents for those that have hauling capabilities.

They are dimensionally large, they are heavy as well.

Anaglyph
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Anaglyph » Sat Dec 28, 2019 4:40 pm

https://desertpods.com

Not affiliated just like there product and they put any profit back into the event.
Last edited by Anaglyph on Sat Dec 28, 2019 4:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Anaglyph
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Anaglyph » Sat Dec 28, 2019 4:44 pm

I bought a desert pod this year. It is about a third of the price of a shiftpod and actually designed for the desert. Not just an iceshelter with reflective surface which is so stupid. An iceshelter in the desert during the day is hell.

Shiftpods are like sweat lodges and are such a stupid Idea for Burning Man. I had two shift pods and sold them because they will make you sweat your ass off!

The desert pod has a very ”cool” design and also retains the heat at night. clever design by a Burner.

Check them out and all the profit goes to Burning Man art projects.


Http://desertpods.com

Oh .... and they cost $550, measure 6’ x 12’ and the rectangular design is much more practice than shiftpod. Easier to pop up and down than shottpods too.

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Ratty
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Ratty » Sat Dec 28, 2019 8:12 pm

They seriously need to work on that website. The 'gallery' was 6 identical photos. the rest of the site was broken or lame. It's a shame. I would have liked to read about it.
Those aren't buttermilk biscuits I'm lying on Savannah

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some seeing eye
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by some seeing eye » Sun Dec 29, 2019 4:12 pm

A little disappointing to have one ice fishing tent trashing the other on here.

BRC has a lot of fly-in and the even harder problem of fly-in+BxB.

For fly-in with rental/car sharing:

Tent + monkey hut with materials sourced at your fly in point. The big box home stores had some BM supply shortages last year and that's likely to continue. You can search for posts on that.

Aluminet tensegrity structure over a tent. You will have to fly in or pre-ship your Aluminet. The stakes, rope and poles don't run out at box home stores. They should be relatively recyclable outbound. I have used 2"x3"x8'-10' lumber with some longer wood screws to keep the rope from slipping, and zip tying them to the ground stake with screws to prevent the post from lifting.

For BxB:

One festival-experienced participant proposes using binder clips to clip emergency orange & silver foil blanket tarps over a non-reflective tent. Those materials travel well. Survival outdoor longer is a brand. This is about the only solution that does BxB. The disadvantage is minimal air space between the reflecting layer and the tent layer.

There is a thread on here for Lycra tensegrity structures. That could work with collapsible poles, stakes, and rope.

Driving from home:

Tent under a carport is for people driving from home. All the other options above work.

BxA:

No solution. Maybe they trade their influencer points for shelter?


Radical self reliance includes making close friends with drive from home participants.
increasing the signal to noise ratio with compassion

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Token
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Token » Sun Dec 29, 2019 4:38 pm

True Story:

From 2001 - 2003 I camped with three $40 cheap-ass Coleman 2-pole tents.

One was a bedroom.

One for storage.

One as a spare and to hold the dirty laundry.

Each tent was like 4 pounds and packed tight n small.

It fucking worked like a charm.

All these fancy shelters remind me of people buying a Peleton stationary bike for $2500 (it’s a dumb mechanical friction bike worth $250 tops), then paying $60 a month for someone to yell at them to use it.

Progress...

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Canoe
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Canoe » Mon Dec 30, 2019 9:54 am

Ratty wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 8:12 pm
They seriously need to work on that website. The 'gallery' was 6 identical photos. the rest of the site was broken or lame. It's a shame. I would have liked to read about it.
Don't hold your breath.
  • It's just another radiant-barrier-shell tent, with what appears it might be a reasonably easy raising structure, with some unspecified and not shown insulation between the two 'rooms'/zones.
  • No floor. So under what winds will it start filling up with hot dusty air?
  • But I'm not convinced on the 'can withstand winds of 100 mph' claim when their photos show rods that appear to be showing some deformation under no wind load in someone's backyard.
  • The photos on the site don't even show the guy-lines in place.
  • But the outside shots show tons of creases in the material, with some of their interior shots showing light shining through those creases (and not even in direct sunlight...). In their photo below, the upper right also shows light coming through some patchs, as though the radiant-barrier surface is missing in patches. Same for the seam on the upper left between the wall and the roof panels. That exterior radiant barrier material is already degraded where it was creased/folded. And that's in someone's backyard, not out on the windy material thrashing playa. Not an encouraging sign that the reflecting surface is going to stay in place and not flake or peel off onto the surrounding playa.
  • And when you want the "cool zone" to be cool, whatever you're cooling it with (swamp cooler?) will be fighting the additional heat load from conducted heat from the 'store the heat of the sun' warm zone (which oddly against their warm-in-sun 'design', is also of the heat-reflecting radiant barrier material, so it will resist/delay heating up; is that part of the 'design').
  • And it's not showing a radiant barrier surface on the inside of the warm zone where you'd want to be keeping heat inside.
  • "Patented heat exchange technology" my ass. No photos, but their diagram shows an "air fan", which would move warm air or cool air, not a actual Heat Exchanger. Perhaps poor insulation is the "heat exchange". Using a fan or fans to blow air to/from a warmer vs cooler room is hardly new. And if you're using dual vent/passages through the "insulated wall", one can be high up on the wall and the other low down, which is a proven way to passively flow warm/cool air from one zone to another.
  • No mention of those fan/fans details, so no way to know how it affects positive vs. negative room pressures and sucking in dusty outside air to the inside. Particularily with no floor.
It's a start.

They/he sure likes buzz words.
"Technology" seems to be the favourite.

Sunlight shining through creases in the radiant barrier shell material. Note patches on upper right side.
Desert Pod - sunlight through creases.jpg
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Jackass
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Jackass » Mon Dec 30, 2019 10:40 am

Token wrote:
Sun Dec 29, 2019 4:38 pm
True Story:

From 2001 - 2003 I camped with three $40 cheap-ass Coleman 2-pole tents.

One was a bedroom.

One for storage.

One as a spare and to hold the dirty laundry.

Each tent was like 4 pounds and packed tight n small.

It fucking worked like a charm.

All these fancy shelters remind me of people buying a Peleton stationary bike for $2500 (it’s a dumb mechanical friction bike worth $250 tops), then paying $60 a month for someone to yell at them to use it.

Progress...
Exactly, a lot of super simple and inexpensive options exist and thrive, if you're not a big puss about it.

Too many people think that big $ spent will yield superior results.

Kinda like the guys that go buy top notch, big $ golf club set-ups and still suck at golf.
Sooner or later, it will get real strange...

11th Principle: Depussyfication - Keeping Burning Man potentially lethal. Token

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Canoe
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Canoe » Mon Dec 30, 2019 10:44 am

Jackass wrote:
Mon Dec 30, 2019 10:40 am
Kinda like the guys that go buy top notch, big $ golf club set-ups and still suck at golf.
Not really. They'd at least (usually) have great clubs, suitable to the purpose and they work well, even if the user doesn't.

With playa structures, $ doesn't necessarily mean better structure, or better heat management, or a better Burn...
Big $ just means you've spent more, not necessarily that those $ where spent on something effective, let alone wisely.
4.669
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That's one word I regret googling during breakfast.
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Video games are giving kids unrealistic expectations on how many swords they can carry.
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, but don't harm the red dragon that frequents the area from time to time. He and I have an agreement.

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Ratty
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Ratty » Mon Dec 30, 2019 10:26 pm

For me it is 10 burns and three tents so far. All garage sale tents. My criteria for a tent.

It must have windows that open for a cross breeze.

The poles or rods must be on the outside of the tent so I can hook straps from them down to the ground.

I have to be able to stand up in it.

It has to be big enough to hold a lot of stuff. (I don't sleep in it.)

It has to have a rain fly.

I sew nylon over any mesh windows that don't close up.

The straps won't let it fall down in the strongest of winds. No tent will keep you cool. With these points of interest, a $10 garage sale tent is just fine.
Those aren't buttermilk biscuits I'm lying on Savannah

Pictures or it didn't happen Greycoyote

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Kenshiro
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Re: Shiftpods vs. Alternatives

Post by Kenshiro » Fri Jan 03, 2020 12:18 pm

My first three burns were in a $40 tent generously advertised as “4-person”. It had flexy plastic poles and flattened in major winds. The last four years I’ve been in a Shiftpod. While I actually would still purchase it (or something similar) all over again, it’s more about the pop-up convenience, durability, and size than anything. As far as heat is concerned all the fancy reflective materials in the world won’t overcome that tents simply greenhouse in the sun no matter what you do. You will get much more improvement having a shade structure, probably for a lot less money and with some ingenuity and research you can make it to travel easier, too.

But even then, your tent will still heat up noticeably hotter than ambient and you simply won’t want to be in it during the day. Which is good because then you get out more and experience what you supposedly paid all that money to go to Burning Man for.

Unless you already plan on multiple Burns...which most people probably shouldn’t do if they haven’t been there yet...I am not of the mind to recommend any fancy-schmancy tents for traveling, first-time Burners. A small compact tent and enough of a shade structure to keep it from getting unbearable until 10 or 11 AM is a more realistic and effective solution, and can be achieved with minimal investment.

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