Bed Ideas!

Ideas, advice, tips, and tricks regarding shelter, shade, tents, and camping. Yes, this includes RV's too.
careacter
Posts: 26
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2004 9:33 pm

Bed Ideas!

Post by careacter » Tue Jun 22, 2004 11:59 am

I said hello in a previous post, but i'll say it again....Hi everybody!

Ok. Would it be wise to bring a futon matress and put it on a few pallets in my tent?

The pros: weight's my home down, gives room for airflow, has comfort, can burn pallets to take home

The cons: (?)

robotland
Posts: 3778
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 8:29 am
Location: Kalamazoo

Post by robotland » Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:05 pm

Make sure your tent is rain-resistant! A waterlogged futon weighs approximately 1,282,596 pounds. It should pick up that lovely playadust smell, though, so you'll have an olfactory keepsake from BRC. I've been caught sniffing my groundcloth before.....(don't tell!)
The pallets should keep you high and dry as far as groundwater is concerned, but you might want to bring a clean tarp to pull over the futon in a hurry if the skies start to darken....
Howdy From Kalamazoo

careacter
Posts: 26
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2004 9:33 pm

Post by careacter » Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:19 pm

with the theme being what it is and having streets named after planets, i imagine we could very well witness a geological or astronomical event.
light rain for me would be welcome.

Good advice on the approximate weight :lol: of a wet futon. I would have had to drive over my tent a few times.

Do you think that 2 pallets & futon would be enough to hold down with the wind?

User avatar
headquarters
Posts: 159
Joined: Mon Sep 08, 2003 4:04 pm
Location: SEATTLE

Post by headquarters » Tue Jun 22, 2004 12:43 pm

you'd prob still want to stake your tent down but a few pallets would definitly stay down esp if you had a few other things in there ie clothes etc..

User avatar
Last Real Burner
Posts: 941
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 9:34 am
Location: Heaven
Contact:

Lay down with burners and you'll get up with...

Post by Last Real Burner » Tue Jun 22, 2004 2:10 pm

I would go the air bed route. they roll up to the size of a large coffee can and are very, very comfortable, and they float in case of massive rain and flooding.


nightly,
mr smith
"Do you know what happened to the boy who got everything he wished for? - He lived happily ever after".

User avatar
Dork
Posts: 2065
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2004 6:01 pm
Location: Las Vegas

Post by Dork » Tue Jun 22, 2004 3:10 pm

I would go the air bed route.
I would not recommend putting your air bed on top of a small pile of short rebar pieces. In my experience, this does not work well. Put it on something flat and non-jagged.

I agree, they do tend to work well. A real mattress or futon mattress will be more comfortable but of course that's a lot of extra cargo space.

Bring a bike tube patch kit and camp pad of some sort just in case.

blyslv
Posts: 1555
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 2:22 pm
Location: Fanta Se NM

Post by blyslv » Tue Jun 22, 2004 3:39 pm

Another thing about air mattresses -- If you lay down on one with someone special and the stars are wheeling overhead and the lights are SO pretty and the mattress sways back and forth ever so slightly -- well, that's a very good thing indeed.

Don't depend on what's in the tent to weigh it down, matey. Stake it and rest assured. Sans stakes, a very high wind will push everything to one side, the tent will become deformed and deranged and not a little cranky. Or is that you when you have to find your clean undies under the pile of other stuff that was rearranged in the 70+ mile per hour gusts that tickled your tent?
Fight for the fifth freedom!

User avatar
robbidobbs
Posts: 2825
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2003 1:07 pm
Burning Since: 1999
Camp Name: Pottie Central
Location: LOS of the Pottie doors

Big on bedding

Post by robbidobbs » Tue Jun 22, 2004 8:26 pm

Bedding is totally my scene. I have back issues and am a career insomniac in the best of conditions, so I've formed a nest effect for on and off playa sleeping arrangements. What has worked amazingly well is a 3" foam pad, actual linens (flannel, knit and woven cotton), a cotton blanket, an acrylic blanket, a quilt and feather pillows. Now you might consider this overkill, but when you've been out partying your ass off for days, it's so nice to go into a real bed. I sleep on the same foam pad off playa and love it. It takes up space, but so does a futon, and it weighs considerably less. I think it floats in flood waters, but I haven't tried this yet. In 99 I had a bad night with the blow-up bed. It deflated, and I was too wreaked to wake up, patch it, and re-inflate it. Not fun. It's heartening to know that my foam pad will always be there for me.

careacter
Posts: 26
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2004 9:33 pm

Post by careacter » Wed Jun 23, 2004 1:09 am

thanks for all replys. I think i will test both the aerobed and foam ideas tommorrow night. also i my mind and i agreed on a structural level for the outside of my dwelling. nighty nite :)_______________________

User avatar
Last Real Burner
Posts: 941
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 9:34 am
Location: Heaven
Contact:

Here's my Sleeping Rig for this year...

Post by Last Real Burner » Wed Jun 23, 2004 2:10 am

I have a Full size Eddie Bauer series air bed from Target, it has a powerful self-contained, battery powered air pump that inflates the bed in 2 minutes and the pump unit simply pops out to deflate it in 2 seconds. It cost all of $45, and is huge, and an unusual "18 thick and has a suede-like top that's nice. I tried the Queen size first and it was absolutely immense, they exchanged it to the full size with less than a blink. I use a heavy duty comforter to cover the mattress and a sheet is usually about all I need. What really cool is that when it's deflated, and rolled up, it's only about 15" around and about 15" tall and comes with a patch kit and a nylon drawstring bag.

nightly,
mr smith
"Do you know what happened to the boy who got everything he wished for? - He lived happily ever after".

User avatar
AntiM
Moderator
Posts: 20222
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2004 5:23 am
Burning Since: 2001
Camp Name: Anti M's Home for Wayward Art
Location: Wild, Wild West
Contact:

Post by AntiM » Wed Jun 23, 2004 7:02 am

I too prefer the "real bed" nest. I love my airbed, but it never seems to remain fully inflated all week. What has worked for me on the last two camping trips has been a self-inflating sleep pad made for backpackers. You just unroll it, open the valves, and it is done. Then I layer on a foam pad (egg crate or titty pad) and flannel sheets, then assorted blankies and softies. Lots of pillows too. I also prefer our tiny tent for two to the big tent, I like the nested feeling and keep little else in the tent other than the bed, me , and Larry.

emily86
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2004 6:38 pm

Futons and beds

Post by emily86 » Wed Jun 23, 2004 9:53 am

Last year we had a 26' diameter pod. The fact that it was so much bigger than our tent made it possible for my boyfriend and I to make our "normal" bed. we skipped the futon, but squished up two Thermarest pads. The Thermarest is high quality. You will be able to use it for every burn. The futon, however, will eventually get soiled and become landfill. Not to be a spokesman for a brand name product, but we were able to make a little bed that felt just like we were at home.

A quality air mattress will roll up smaller and has a longer life span. This is good. Anytime we can reduce our post bman waste products is a good thing.

User avatar
theCryptofishist
Posts: 40313
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:28 am
Burning Since: 2017
Location: In Exile

Re: Lay down with burners and you'll get up with...

Post by theCryptofishist » Wed Jun 23, 2004 2:23 pm

Last Real Burner wrote:. . . and they float in case of massive rain and flooding.
I can see us now, after the big rain storm, paddling all over BRC on our beds. . . Relaxing, if a little '02.

sgrunspa
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 6:02 pm
Location: LA,CA

Post by sgrunspa » Wed Jun 23, 2004 2:29 pm

i use an air mattress costco, 29.99. it came with its own rechargeable pump. the bed needed inflating every two days, but the charge in the pump lasted much longer than the event. It was no big deal to give it a 15 second pump before retiring. however, the playa dust made the pump sound like an angry beaver everytime I turned it on after day 3. And since then, it has gone from angry beaver to angry chainsaw.
time wounds all heels - groucho marx

User avatar
theCryptofishist
Posts: 40313
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:28 am
Burning Since: 2017
Location: In Exile

Post by theCryptofishist » Wed Jun 23, 2004 2:31 pm

sgrunspa wrote:it has gone from angry beaver to angry chainsaw.
So long as it's chopping down those trees, its destiny is fulfilled.

User avatar
antron
Posts: 240
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 1:00 pm
Location: on your screen

Post by antron » Wed Jun 23, 2004 10:57 pm

i took a futon last year and really liked sleeping on it. i covered it with a couple of sheets that i didn't care about, and it held up fine. little residual odor detected after the event. i'm planning on bringing one again.

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Thu Jun 24, 2004 1:33 am

I think futons are made for people who weigh less than 150 pounds...I've always found futons to be unforgiveably unyielding. No joke, when I stayed with a friend in New Orleans, I had a choice between the futon and a Barcalounger. Picked the first, beat my joints to hell, picked up and moved to the lounger. Ahhhhh —! :D

Plus, yes, they're pills when it comes to transport. Take up a LOT of space. Collapsible, collapsible, collapsible.

Last year, my Aerobed got shredded by something on the last day. This year I'm going with a 6" foam pad and a featherbed.

Tip for people who sleep/shelter in the back of their SUV/truck with camper: lay your bed down first and pack on top of it. As you unload and set up camp, your bed is revealed underneath and is ready to collapse into when you're done.
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

robotland
Posts: 3778
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 8:29 am
Location: Kalamazoo

Re: Lay down with burners and you'll get up with...

Post by robotland » Thu Jun 24, 2004 5:56 am

theCryptofishist wrote:
Last Real Burner wrote:. . . and they float in case of massive rain and flooding.
I can see us now, after the big rain storm, paddling all over BRC on our beds. . . Relaxing, if a little '02.
Last year my wife and I stayed in a beach bungalow on the north shore of Oahu; They filmed part of "The Big Bounce" there, in fact, and there was still fake palm thatch on the roof for set dressing. One bungalow of the eight or so was up on stilts, (ours) and after settling in I noticed a bound booklet on a side table with an article about a man who was awakened by a huge wave that blew in and washed him and his bed completely out of the building. It was the very same room that we were in, and that particular unit had been stilted in case it happened again. (!!) Not being accustomed to being that close to some of the most spectacular surf on Earth, I woke up every time a large wave came in and had some very predictable dreams.....
Howdy From Kalamazoo

User avatar
BAS
Posts: 4257
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2004 7:46 pm
Burning Since: 2006
Location: Wisconsin

Post by BAS » Thu Jun 24, 2004 7:32 pm

Tip for people who sleep/shelter in the back of their SUV/truck with camper: lay your bed down first and pack on top of it. As you unload and set up camp, your bed is revealed underneath and is ready to collapse into when you're done.
Yeah, that is more or less how my dad has arranged the back of his van. He has a platform built in back, with space for storage underneat it. On top of the platform is a futon for him and my mom (when she accompanies him camping). Stuff can be stored on top of the futon and taken out when camp is set up. A full sized van like my dad has is great for camping, except for the gas mileage.... :?

Part of me wants to buy and old school bus, or an old short bus. Maybe if I had the space to experiment with bio-diesel I might get one. Otherwise, the cost of fuel would be problematic. (I have heard that Ford is coming out with a hybred version of the Escape. Now, if only I weren't broke, that would be a vehicle which would seriously tempt me!)

Anyway, I am having an even worse case than normal of rambling, so I think I will shut up now. :oops:
"Nothing is withheld from us which we have conceived to do.
Do things that have never been done."
--Russell Kirsch

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Thu Jun 24, 2004 9:23 pm

Yeah, I'm thinking of building a teardrop trailer for next year. Just saw a show on them on Discovery Travel and I thought, "Wow, 700-pound travel trailer that costs as little as $2000 to make, how cool is that?"

Customly consolidates a lot into a 4x8x6' unit: water tank, bedroom, kitchen, even bathroom according to some plans. Pull the trailer, food and water in the back of the tow vehicle, toys and bike on the roof rack.

Sat right down with the graph paper and draughted one up that night. When you're working that small you can afford little luxuries like a Silestone countertop and oak cabinets in the galley, solar panels on the roof, art glass window in the door...
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

User avatar
BAS
Posts: 4257
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2004 7:46 pm
Burning Since: 2006
Location: Wisconsin

Post by BAS » Fri Jun 25, 2004 5:17 pm

Where could I get more information on teardrop trailers? They sound interesting, and a lot of vehicle makers have the limit of 1000 pounds for towing-- so a 700 pound trailer sounds good!

Thanks!
"Nothing is withheld from us which we have conceived to do.
Do things that have never been done."
--Russell Kirsch

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Fri Jun 25, 2004 6:38 pm

BAS wrote:Where could I get more information on teardrop trailers?
Google on "teardrop trailer." Here's a few of the better sites I found:

http://www.teardrops.net

http://www.aerotear.com/
This one is a company that makes them but I found some good tips for materials. They use oak and birch plywood.

http://www.tinytears.cc/teardrop2.html
They're out of date in terms of events but the information is timeless.

<b><u>!!Note!!</b></u> Avoid the Teardrop Trailer BBS. It has a fistful of pop-up and headline ads that have nothing to do with teardrop trailers and one was obnoxious enough to crash my machine.
a lot of vehicle makers have the limit of 1000 pounds for towing-- so a 700 pound trailer sounds good!
700 is actually on the heavier side, most are around five hundred. Aerotear's is 580. Seven hundred is a teardrop trailer with fully-stocked galley. Most plans allow for a 7-gallon water tank, a Burner teardrop will naturally need about a 10-gallon tank. But according to sources, even a motorcycle or street rod can tow them.
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

User avatar
BAS
Posts: 4257
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2004 7:46 pm
Burning Since: 2006
Location: Wisconsin

Post by BAS » Fri Jun 25, 2004 8:28 pm

!!Note!! Avoid the Teardrop Trailer BBS. It has a fistful of pop-up and headline ads that have nothing to do with teardrop trailers and one was obnoxious enough to crash my machine.
Urgh! I have enough trouble with my machine already..., it does NOT need another excuse to crash! (Ya know-- I never had problems with my old Commodore 64 crashing..., fried power supplies, yes, crashing for no apparent reason, no. :wink: )

I have no idea what I will be driving when I finally make it to BM, so I do want to keep the weight of any trailers down. I'm still thinking about building the yurt, but a trailer might have its advantages. (Maybe the yurt will have the bowling alley?) The trailer might be a better place to hide out in nasty weather?

Thanks for the prompt answer! :D
"Nothing is withheld from us which we have conceived to do.
Do things that have never been done."
--Russell Kirsch

User avatar
'stine
Posts: 63
Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 9:43 pm
Location: Savannah, GA

Post by 'stine » Mon Jun 28, 2004 4:29 pm

I'm thinking it might be in my best interest to play Goldilocks and test out some of the beds being discussed.....perhaps while ya'll're out partying I will sneak into your burrows of slumber and have myself a micro nap. :-)

I'm flying in and don't have the luxury of packing (and paying to fly) most of the inviting bedding mentioned. So from that angle, it sounds like an inflatable full mattress and sleeping bag will have to do, along with my red Masai blanket (a practical yet emotional woobie/security blanket).

Is there any reason not to leave some of the well sealed containers of water in your tent to help weigh it down?

User avatar
BAS
Posts: 4257
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2004 7:46 pm
Burning Since: 2006
Location: Wisconsin

Post by BAS » Mon Jun 28, 2004 6:23 pm

Oh, and by the way, I have a PDF from an SCA site with instructions on how to make a collapsible bed! I came across it while messing around on the site after downloading an article on how to build a yurt. The bed has a wood frame, canvas "matress" and rope to keep the canvas reasonabley taut. I don't know how well it would work, since I don't think I will have the time to build one, even with waiting until 2005! (Especially since I now want to build a teardrop trailer! Darn you, Diane O'Thirst!!! :wink: )

P.S.: Hey, the instructions for the yurt I have are for a 16' diameter yurt. The plans I like best thus far for a teardrop trailer are for one with an overall length of only 11'4" (Kuffel Creek Press's "8' Cubby")..., maybe I could put a trailer in the yurt and have a private bedroom and indoor kitchen...!)

(Now all I need is to get the time, money, and a workshop.... :roll: )
"Nothing is withheld from us which we have conceived to do.
Do things that have never been done."
--Russell Kirsch

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Mon Jun 28, 2004 7:14 pm

BAS wrote:Oh, and by the way, I have a PDF from an SCA site with instructions on how to make a collapsible bed!
Too bad my antique old machine won't read PDFs, for some reason :(
Still, I'm pretty sure taut canvas would be awfully brutal on me poor ol' joints. How about canvas webbing, little more give to it?
I don't know how well it would work, since I don't think I will have the time to build one, even with waiting until 2005! (Especially since I now want to build a teardrop trailer! Darn you, Diane O'Thirst!!!)
:lol: You could probably fit one of those fold-up futon couches in a teardrop. That's what I'm thinking of doing. Anything less than 3.5' wide.
P.S.: Hey, the instructions for the yurt I have are for a 16' diameter yurt. The plans I like best thus far for a teardrop trailer are for one with an overall length of only 11'4" (Kuffel Creek Press's "8' Cubby")..., maybe I could put a trailer in the yurt and have a private bedroom and indoor kitchen...!)
That may be possible, depending on your tow vehicle. If it's a full-size pickup or SUV like an F-250 or a Suburban with a roof rack, yeah, no problem. The rafters and door aren't too bad, but the lattice wall can get pretty big and the dome is rather unwieldy, in my experience. If you just went with a nice flat artglass skylight instead of a dome, it might be a little easier to pack.
If it were me, I'd have the yurt as a nice chill zone/guest parlour and just build a bunch of brackets to accept canopies for the kitchen and door. If you look around there's some pictures of dressing vestibules that are propped off the teardrop's door.
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Regarding Yurt as Trailer Garage

Post by diane o'thirst » Mon Jun 28, 2004 7:29 pm

Wait, I just thought about that. It'd be overkill.
  • The yurt is plenty shelter enough. Especially a 16-footer.
    The yurt would be prettier than the trailer, IMO.
    You'd have to build the yurt around the trailer and that could be troublesome.
    The yurt has more room, and more headroom.
The only downside is the trailer represents easier logistics than the yurt does. No parts to assemble, just hitch up, hit the grocery store and go. Lower trailer jack and jackstands, open galley, furl canopy and unroll bed when you get there and you're ready to rock.

Screw it. If you want shade and privacy for the teardrop, just get a Costco canopy to back it into and have the yurt as your interaction space.
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

User avatar
BAS
Posts: 4257
Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2004 7:46 pm
Burning Since: 2006
Location: Wisconsin

Post by BAS » Mon Jun 28, 2004 7:50 pm

Well, I was playing with some graph paper and a compass today to see how the idea of a TT inside a yurt would work. My idea was that the yurt would be erected around the trailer, with the trailer towards the edge of the yurt. If my (impercise) calculations are correct, the trailer would take up about half the yurt. I was playing with the idea of using the trailer hitch as part of the interior decor, but ran out of break time....

Actually, I have no idea what sort of vehicle I will have-- my 1987 Mercury Sable is most definitely NOT in good enough shape for me to trust it on that long a journey! (Plus, the truck is out of commission, and it doesn't have a trailer hitch.) If I can't get together the money to replace it, I am at the mercy of whatever luggage space I can scrounge from other people.

If I have the time, money, workshop, etc. to build both the yurt and a t.trailer, I don't know if I will go through with putting one inside the other or not. I'd probably set it up somewhere before hand and see how much space is taken up by the trailer. Plus, it depends upon what other members of our group decide to bring. The whole "Let's go to Burning Man in 2005!" thing was started by a friend of mine who forwarded me some plans for a PVC and parachute dome with the note that he wanted to build one! (It will be interesting to see if I wind up building a yurt and he doesn't get around to building the dome.... If that happens, the yurt WILL be needed as a group area!)

Argh! I should be getting ready for bed! (I got woke up by Illinois' earthquake last night, and, not having a clue as to what had woke me up, stayed awake for hours trying to figure out what had happened. Us folk in Wisconsin aren't used to having the earth move....)
"Nothing is withheld from us which we have conceived to do.
Do things that have never been done."
--Russell Kirsch

User avatar
antron
Posts: 240
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 1:00 pm
Location: on your screen

Post by antron » Mon Jun 28, 2004 9:41 pm

diane o'thirst wrote:I think futons are made for people who weigh less than 150 pounds...
um...i last saw 150 lbs in 1978 or so.

so it's not bodyweight that makes them comfortable. i think it's simply what you're used to. i can't sleep on a bare wood floor, but put some carpet under me, and i'm out. a futon is luxury.

give me a soft rock.

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Mon Jun 28, 2004 10:00 pm

I'd say stick with just building the yurt. It'll be great and very cool, it's good shelter, you can bond as a camp with the setup process, it will last you years and years. If this is your first year, you'll be full of a million ideas and want to do them all at once. Ya gotta pace yourself or you'll find yourself out $8000 like I was my first year...

The only reason I'm doing the teardrop trailer and not using my yurt is because I have it on semi-permanent loan to Opera Camp as a part of its public infrastructure. I <i>could</i> be selfish and say, "Nope, you can't have it, I'm using it to shelter in this year" but that would make me distinctly unpopular. So I loan them my shelter for use as a small ritual and chill space and come up with ideas like umbrella huts and teardrop trailer.

By the way...on the subject of PVC domes...they have a tendency to break after two or three years. And I <u>mean</u> "break," like shatter into a bazillion flinders (that you gotta pick out of the Playa cracks after the chorus of dismayed katzenjammering at the loss of your shelter and shade). You're better off getting a metal saw, a steel-bending press, a drill press and metal-cutting bit and doing it in EMT struts bolted together. Little more effort, little more complicated but it'll last forever and you can sell it when you've outgrown it. Death Guild sold theirs for something like $1500 a few years ago.
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

Post Reply

Return to “Building Camps & Villages”