A tent to survive the desert ?

Ideas, advice, tips, and tricks regarding shelter, shade, tents, and camping. Yes, this includes RV's too.
User avatar
El_Niño
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 2:24 pm
Location: Black York City
Contact:

A tent to survive the desert ?

Post by El_Niño » Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:26 am

Hi,
I can't find any thread on this topic so please redirect me if there's one..

How does one find a good tent for the desert ? One that keeps a bit of warmth at night and does not heat up to 110 degrees by 8am... And where do I find one for cheap ?
Thanks for any camping tips.
El Niño
[i]Science is like sex : sometimes something useful comes out of it, but it's not the primary reason why you are doing it. [/i] Richard Feynman.

User avatar
Badger
Posts: 3322
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 2:43 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by Badger » Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:52 am

I don't think you'll find many tenets that provide heat insulation at night. That's where your clothes layering, blankets or a good sleping bag come in. What size are you looking for and (i.e. how many people do you see sleeping in it at a time?)
Desert dogs drink deep.

User avatar
El_Niño
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 2:24 pm
Location: Black York City
Contact:

Post by El_Niño » Tue Jun 07, 2005 9:59 am

[quote="Badger" That's where your clothes layering, blankets or a good sleping bag come in. What size are you looking for and (i.e. how many people do you see sleeping in it at a time?)[/quote]

Depends how lucky I get !!

A a 3 person tent should do, because I want to keep it portable.
[i]Science is like sex : sometimes something useful comes out of it, but it's not the primary reason why you are doing it. [/i] Richard Feynman.

User avatar
unjonharley
Posts: 10346
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 11:05 am
Burning Since: 2001
Camp Name: Elliot's naked bycycel repair
Location: Salem Or.

Post by unjonharley » Tue Jun 07, 2005 10:06 am

any ole pup tent will do. Just set it up and go "teepee creeping" for more room and staying warm.
I'm the contraptioneer your mother warned you about.

blyslv
Posts: 1555
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 2:22 pm
Location: Fanta Se NM

Post by blyslv » Tue Jun 07, 2005 11:04 am

What Dr. Strangelove said about heating, that's up to you and your layers. For shade, think another layer outside the tent. I use camo netting supported by EMT conduit. But a tarp would work just as well. One or even two layers of nylon will not stop the shade from heating up a tent. In any event stake down the four corners with cement stakes and don't worry about it moving. It is hard to imagine anybody wanting to move a tent once it's set up, but chaque-unes ont leurs goutes.
Fight for the fifth freedom!

User avatar
El_Niño
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 2:24 pm
Location: Black York City
Contact:

Post by El_Niño » Tue Jun 07, 2005 12:34 pm

blyslv wrote:chaque-unes ont leurs goutes.
? I haven't seen many drops on the playa... except when the watertruck comes by.
What's EMT conduit ? I will have a another shade structure on top of my pod (probably with 1 or 2 other tents) but "deux précautions valent mieux qu'une". It was so hot in my tent last year I really want to do whatever I can to grab just one more hour of sleep in the morning...
[i]Science is like sex : sometimes something useful comes out of it, but it's not the primary reason why you are doing it. [/i] Richard Feynman.

blyslv
Posts: 1555
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 2:22 pm
Location: Fanta Se NM

Post by blyslv » Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:14 pm

I think EMT stands for "electro-mechanical tubing." It is a metal tube, 10 feet long. It comes in 3/4, 1 inch and 2 inch diameters. It can be cut with a hacksaw. Any of the big box Borg stores will sell it, but it can be expensive, around $10 a tube. Look to places that resell building material and you can get it for 1/10th the cost, for example in my town Habitat for Humanity sometimes has it for a dollar a stick.

The one inch tubes can slip over an 18 inch cement stake pounded into the playa and this provides a pretty strong free standing pole. Using that as the frame you can then hang some material, shade cloth, camo netting, tarps. The first two will shed high winds better, but provide less then 100% shade. To increase the shade you can double the netting and it creates a nice dappled effect. Some guy lines might be neccesary and a vehicle makes a good windbreak and anchor.

If you have sewing skills, it is fun to make a sleeve for the tubing so it's not so butt ugly.

Finally there are kits available that let you configure the tubing into a very solid "carport" type structure. I got mine on Ebay. Search carport klits. The silver tarping, with one layer of camo netting over it produced noticiably cooler tempratures during the days. I used additional camo netting to extend the sides. It was bombproof agianst the wind.
Fight for the fifth freedom!

blyslv
Posts: 1555
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 2:22 pm
Location: Fanta Se NM

Post by blyslv » Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:15 pm

"To each their own" c'est ne pas "Everyone has their own taste"

Chaque-un a ses goutes?
Fight for the fifth freedom!

User avatar
El_Niño
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 2:24 pm
Location: Black York City
Contact:

Post by El_Niño » Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:51 pm

Oh, wow, you meant "A chacun ses goûts".. sorry, I tried my best but I really had no idea what you said. Now it all makes sense...

Conduit seems to be the way and camouflage netting seems a rather popular solution. Some girls in my camp want to thread flowers in it to subdue the military connotation - but we hadn't thought about hiding the poles, and will keep that one in mind.
Thanks for your tips !!

PS : with your shade proficiency and my French , we could make a good team in a French Burning Man event. Unfortunately I don't think there are any. Yet. (EuroBurn is in Spain).
[i]Science is like sex : sometimes something useful comes out of it, but it's not the primary reason why you are doing it. [/i] Richard Feynman.

blyslv
Posts: 1555
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 2:22 pm
Location: Fanta Se NM

Post by blyslv » Tue Jun 07, 2005 2:28 pm

<pedantic, earth gaurdian LNT dweeb>

Flowers would quickly turn to moop. Netting comes in a large array of designer colors, google around. I like the snow camo best for the desert. In gigsville someone built a huge camo netting that covered numerous tents and a bar. I thought it looked quite attractive. Somehow ours turned into red white and blue, military connotations of a different hue.

When is the euro burn?
Fight for the fifth freedom!

User avatar
El_Niño
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 2:24 pm
Location: Black York City
Contact:

Post by El_Niño » Tue Jun 07, 2005 2:50 pm

We would use plastic flowers and firmly attach them onto the net... But designer camo sounds marvellous. If only if could be made pink and orange.
EuroBurn will take place in July 21-24.
http://www.euroburners.org/wikka/HomePage
[i]Science is like sex : sometimes something useful comes out of it, but it's not the primary reason why you are doing it. [/i] Richard Feynman.

Specialfxlady
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2005 10:53 am
Location: Baltimore, MD
Contact:

Post by Specialfxlady » Wed Jun 15, 2005 7:36 am

I'm sorry, are you saying that camoflage netting would make an adequate shade structure? I'm looking for information on shade structures and I'm having a bit of trouble. I'm flying in from Baltimore so I'll have very little room for much. I am looking for a good cheap shade structure that will be fairly easly to assemble.

cheers
SFXL

on a side note, I'm actually camping with the Lamplighters, I know there will be shade structure there, I'm just thinking of how I can keep my tent a bit cooler in the morning for sleep.

Also, can anyone reccommend what type of tent is best for one person and their stuff, something that won't let *as much* dust in. I know there is no way to keep it completely dust-proof.

thanks again!

User avatar
unjonharley
Posts: 10346
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 11:05 am
Burning Since: 2001
Camp Name: Elliot's naked bycycel repair
Location: Salem Or.

Post by unjonharley » Wed Jun 15, 2005 7:43 am

Specialfxlady wrote:I'm sorry, are you saying that camoflage netting would make an adequate shade structure? I'm looking for information on shade structures and I'm having a bit of trouble. I'm flying in from Baltimore so I'll have very little room for much. I am looking for a good cheap shade structure that will be fairly easly to assemble.

cheers
SFXL


~
If your flying in, Camp with a new friend. Even an old crank like me would share a little shade.

Never met a friend I did'nt like
I'm the contraptioneer your mother warned you about.

User avatar
phil
Posts: 2936
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2005 2:10 pm
Location: Codgerville

Re: A tent to survive the desert ?

Post by phil » Wed Jun 15, 2005 3:16 pm

[quote="El_Niño"]Hi,
I can't find any thread on this topic so please redirect me if there's one..

How does one find a good tent for the desert ? One that keeps a bit of warmth at night and does not heat up to 110 degrees by 8am... And where do I find one for cheap ?
Thanks for any camping tips.
El Niño[/quote]

Hi, Niño,

All enclosures heat up to 110 degrees during the day, so I don't think you'll find a tent that fits that need. I've heard people say that putting three layers of shade with air between them all over a tent will keep it useable during the day, but I've never tried it.

My suggestion is both a tent and a separate shade which is open on at least two sides for air flow will be your better bet. _Personally_, shade material that lets in _any_ infrared has not worked for me. I need a completely opaque covering to keep my cool when the weather is hot (a hundred degrees Farhenheit or higher). This means 'flys' and camo netting do not work for me as shade.

I use a shade with two side flaps in addition to the roof. I put up one flap to the east in the morning, I add the southern flap as noon approaches, then I move the eastern flap to the west as the sun heads west. This gives full shade throughout the day, while allowing any breeze to clear out the air under the shade and keep it from baking inside.

(As an aside, I once tried two layers of 60% camo, but that made for 120% shade, and I had to go out in the sun to warm up too often for my comfort. It was just too cold under the double camo.)

Oh, and bring a carpet remnant or something to put under your shade so you don't lay in the dirt.

Phil

User avatar
shitmouse
Posts: 486
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 8:31 am
Location: sf

Post by shitmouse » Wed Jun 22, 2005 3:43 pm

i can't say enough how important it is to cover your tent with some sort of shade. you will get cooked out of your tent in the morning if you have no shade over it. period. also use your cars or vans to create wind blocks and added shade. sleep is good.

as for which one to buy, Kelty makes a lower-class brand named "Ridgeway", and the tent is called the "Ridgeline", it's a 9 man tent with 4 rooms. rooms for friends, and the center for your gear. your gear also helps hold the tent down in winds. too, coleman makes a few large tents you can use. cheap and as long as you employ a vehicle or two for wind block, you don't need the uber expensive 9 season tent. just shade.

-b
=-=-= \<>/ =-=-=

DoctorIknow
Posts: 774
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2004 3:07 pm
Burning Since: 1998
Location: Sacramento

tent

Post by DoctorIknow » Wed Jun 22, 2005 11:10 pm

For six years I've used a cheap Coleman (17' x 9') "Weathermaster 3 room tent" under two layers of camo on top and on the sides the sun beats in (especially that nasty morning sun)

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemanc ... ryid=11020

The special thing about this tent is that ALL windows can be closed. This is VERY rare for a tent (so many have a net top!) and during the worst white outs of the past six years, it actually has been bearable inside. (For all tentgoers with sticky zippers from playa dust: take one of those pressurized spritz bottles and wash your zippers once in a while...works great.) Also, also, every window can act as a door...very nice if a campmate wants to enter/exit with privacy.

I believe you can find these for $164 most anywhere, retail is $199, and there is one on ebay now with no bids for $90. One would think this to be a "family" tent and be a wimp in wind, but not true...I've been amazed at how its held up.

The "middle room" (the biggest) can become very toasty with just a propane two mantle gas latern. I've had BM neighboors come knocking many times to warm up... As far as sleeping late in the morning, whatever tent you have (and rain covers don't do squat for keeping the tent cool) make sure your SIDE shading is as good as anything over the tent. Get twice as much camo as you think you'll need (during the first day or two you'll find weak spots and need to toss on an extra one) and ways to attach it to itself. (small "sizzors" type clamps work great and are about $1/dozen - -I use about 100 of 'em) I make a 25' x 25' square out of line for the top, and suspend it (stretch it with big torque, actually) from just four eight foot 2x4's, one at each corner (eight guylines, total). Middle of space camo sagging weight is supported with 2x2's that I screw together to be about 12' high (one nail at top of each 2x2 to grab camo, although the military uses discs), which leaves plenty of room for the tent. In big storms, the camo and 2x2's dance all over the place, but flexibility is the key to this cheap structures survival...

I've coveted the aliuminet since I saw it, but it is VERY pricy. The camo is not nice to handle, it's heavy, takes up too much storage space, damn strings in it break, nylon "shade strips" shift and leave big sun holes, and I haven't even bothered trying to clean mine for years. Why bother???

Someone here said they were looking for cheap, effective and lightweight shade?
No such thing... (isn't that why there's CenterCamp????) ok, bad joke...

MrMullen
Posts: 315
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 6:39 pm
Location: San Diego
Contact:

Walmart!

Post by MrMullen » Thu Jun 23, 2005 9:54 am

Ya, I know you people love them, but if don't like them try Target. Target is like Walmart but without the great number of fat people.

I got a cheap $50 tent 4 man tent at Walmart last year and used it at burning man it works great. Yes, it get hot in the day, but you won't find a tent under $200 that does not turn into an oven. I also crammed a queen size inflatable matress in it, and I sleep like a baby during Burningman.

This year, I went out and bought a large 17x10 tent and I am fairly sure it will survive the high winds. The only thing about tents that you have to be really sure about are the tent stakes. You can't use the default ones they give you, you have to get big ones, like rebar. Of course, that means bending them and shaping them how you like, but if you do it right, they work perfectly.

As for shade structure, I am going to try camo netting (2 of them) or something like it. I need to break up the sun but not catch the wind, which you all know.
--
Mr Mullen

DoctorIknow
Posts: 774
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2004 3:07 pm
Burning Since: 1998
Location: Sacramento

K-Mart tents on sale

Post by DoctorIknow » Thu Jun 23, 2005 7:36 pm

Saw a big tent on TV from Kmart, 25% off for the holiday, this might be it (althought website is only 10% off):

http://www.kmart.com/catalog/product.js ... oryId=1152

I don't know this tent: most important is that there are zippered closures for EVERY screen (lots of new tents have screened tops and depend on the rain fly to keep out weather, which doesn't help at all for dust)

A three/four person tent is great if you can get enough camo or aluminet to shade it. Also, you HAVE to be able to stand up. It's great to throw all stuff in one room and then have spaciousness in the other rooms. Going to the car for stuff gets old...

I bring one of those floor cleaning gizmos, Swiffer is one, that has the disposable moistened pads, and I clean the entire floor of my big tent in a minute or two. Clean and dust floor under bare feet such a luxury out there...

User avatar
HughMungus
Posts: 1813
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2004 10:17 am
Location: Dallas, TX

Re: A tent to survive the desert ?

Post by HughMungus » Thu Jun 23, 2005 7:51 pm

I've said this before and I'll say it again: if you must sleep in a tent, get a cot to put your sleeping bag on. It keeps you off the ground and that's 100x better than sleeping on the ground. You'll thank me.

Speaking of tents, anyone know if highly-reflective (mirror) material on a tent would help with daytime heat?
It's what you make it.

DoctorIknow
Posts: 774
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2004 3:07 pm
Burning Since: 1998
Location: Sacramento

aluminet on tent and cots

Post by DoctorIknow » Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:03 pm

If you are talking about mylar type sheeting, like a space blanket, I have no experience except to know that space blankets will rip to shreads VERY easily...

A guy next to me last year had aluminet (spelled $$$$) directly on his tent, no airspace at all. He said the alternative energy camp people advised him it was as effective as suspending it above. His only regret was that his piece didn't come down the sides all the way....

If the sun hits just the bottom two feet of a tent, one wakes up in hell... I would say the morning shade material is even more important than the day shade material 'cause during the day at least you are more likely to have a brain that can tell you to do something about your overheated self.... in the 8am slumber, the brain goes into denial: "If I move my pillow like so, I can block my head so the radiation from the sun hitting the tent is negated" or "Maybe a cloud will come over" or "I can take this, it won't get any hotter." :lol:

That's right about sleeping on the ground....even with a hiking style pad (Thermarest, etc.) you won't be too happy. I use an air mattress, and the most important thing about of them is to have a big thick insulation between you and the air mattress. Like a moving pad, or quite a few blankets. What happens is your body is trying to heat up the air in the mattress all night long. When you first lay down, you'll notice how cool it is,,,well, it doesn't change and you will be most uncomfortable without padding...

User avatar
TheJudge
Posts: 405
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2003 3:56 pm
Location: Austin, TX

Post by TheJudge » Wed Jun 29, 2005 1:54 pm

Cheap tents will give you what you pay for.

Expensive tents might not be good either.

Get a dome tent. Something that allows wind to curve around it, rather than a flat-walled tent that will lose in a battle with mother nature. If you can park your car or truck in the path of the prevailing wind, that will also work well to keep things secured.

Also, find a rain fly that covers as much as possible. Those little beanie flys on most cheapo tents usually just become really unweildy kites.

Forget any kind of tent that comes with a nifty screened-in area, like a porch. The wind will tear that to shreads.

And if sleeping during the day is important to you, sleep on a webbed cot that allows ventilation underneath you. Have a spray bottle handy or wear a damp t-shirt as well. Then get an ez-up to put over the tent. The extra shade will help to keep the tent a little more insulated, but if its really a really hot day, you may just be S.O.L. no matter what.
"Be at one with the dust of the earth. This is primal union." - Lao Tsu

Kinetic IV
Posts: 2977
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2005 7:34 pm
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine as of 10/27/06

Post by Kinetic IV » Wed Jun 29, 2005 2:03 pm

To give a little illustration of what The Judge is talking about your tent will need to ride out conditions like this. Plan accordingly.

Image
K-IV
~~~~
Thank you for over 7 years of eplaya memories. I have asked Emily Sparkle to delete my account and I am gone. Goodbye and Goodluck to all of you! I will miss you!

Steven bradford
Posts: 351
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 11:29 pm
Location: Seattle
Contact:

Post by Steven bradford » Sat Jul 02, 2005 1:29 pm

Seconding many of the main points made here.

I've used a cheap coleman two room family style tent since 97. I've used large stakes I bought separately, but never used rebar stakes. It has stayed put in every single storm since.

1 Shade over tent-- even if it's just a tarp thrown over the tent. This works if your tent has the poles on the outside, so there is a bit of an air gap
Even better is to have a full shade structure over it, that has airflow. You can also go in with other people and put your small tents under one of those costco garages.

2 I forget what it's called, but that bubble foil stuff you can buy per the foot at a hardware store is great. For RV and car windows, and on any sun exposed part of your tent. Also will help somewhat with holding warmth at night.

3. Keep heavy stuff, such as water, in the tent, and or tie tent down to water cans. I also tie the tent to vehicles. Best is to set the tent in the shade of a motor Home, and tie down to that, in addition to stakes.
Steve

Paint or Be Painted
http://www.seanet.com/~bradford/Body_Painting_Technique.html

DoctorIknow
Posts: 774
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2004 3:07 pm
Burning Since: 1998
Location: Sacramento

tying tent to car/RV etc.

Post by DoctorIknow » Sat Jul 02, 2005 2:24 pm

I have to disagree with using a vehicle to secure the tent...

Assuming the tent is the space used for sleeping, waking up, waiting out storms, chilling, eating (if outside sucks) resting, napping, tokin', fking, etc., I prefer to see out all the windows, and I don't want to see a tire or blank wall of a vehicle.

Just a few extra polls, posts, lines, rebar and shade material will be sufficient to ancor a structure with a 360 view. I've seen MANY use three vehicles in a U shape and stretching shade between, and that's certainly strong and logical, but WTF, you get tunnel vision! Might as well get an RV and insulate yourself from the experience even more!

Steven bradford
Posts: 351
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 11:29 pm
Location: Seattle
Contact:

Post by Steven bradford » Sat Jul 02, 2005 2:40 pm

In 8 burns I can't remember spending more than five seconds looking out my tent "windows"-- Which were usually zipped up or covered by shade structure. Certainly zipped up during storms.

But that's me. Certainly a view might be important if you do a lot of tent time.
Steve

Paint or Be Painted
http://www.seanet.com/~bradford/Body_Painting_Technique.html

salomonster
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2005 4:09 pm

Post by salomonster » Tue Jul 05, 2005 4:16 pm

Tent - get a good one but you don't need the best one.

More important is that you get one that is big enough... Especially if you are sharing... My girlfriend and I have a 6 person and we are only 2... It's very nice having space... And beleive me you use it.

The most important thing to think about it that it's your living space. So you kinda don't want to go in an out for no reason - your living space will be a dirty place...

Some friends who had been a bunch of time brought an extra tent for leaving their gear, clothes and costumes... It's nice cause you have more space in your "living" space...

Another thing is to keep in mind is that - your tent will get dusty... We actually sewed our vents shut... My girlfriend is a sewing fanatic and it really did help.... And yes we still got dust... It's unavoidable...

-A tarp over your tent is a good idea...
-A tarp under the tent is good too... works like a welcoming matt. So you can leave your shoes outside...
-tent pegs are critical

User avatar
AntiM
Moderator
Posts: 20222
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2004 5:23 am
Burning Since: 2001
Camp Name: Anti M's Home for Wayward Art
Location: Wild, Wild West
Contact:

Post by AntiM » Tue Jul 05, 2005 6:46 pm

I prefer a tiny tent, barely big enough for the two of us to sleep in. All our clothes and gear is in totes in the shade structure, with the more sensitive items in the jeep. We use the topper on the jepp for spare bedding, clothes, light things. That's just me though, sleeping in a larger tent makes me restless, especially when it is windy. We've tried bigger tents, but when I keep my stuff in it, I'm too hot going afer things and track too much dust into the tent.

We do cover the top of our tent with a heavy velvet curtain (70s vintage burnt orange) instead of a tarp, and clip it on with spring clamps to keep the dust out. It molds to our little tent quite nicely, better than a stiff plastic tarp would do. Our top vent is our only vent, the windows zip shut. I try to make the bed up and put the pilows under the top cover so if dust does get in the bed is still relatively clean after taking off the top blanket or quilt. (making my bed at Burning Man, how ... fussy).

A welcome mat is essential in front of the tent, a place to remove your shoes and wipe your feet so you don't track dust into your bed. We keep wipes in the tent and I sit in the door, wipe my feet and then crawl in. (too many years in Japan)

It all depends on personal preferences and shade structures.

User avatar
Tumbleweed
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 5:58 pm
Location: Stinson Beach, CA

Post by Tumbleweed » Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:00 pm

Great tips. Thanks everyone...

RobOIDAHO
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2005 10:01 am
Location: Twin Falls-Idaho

tent in the desert

Post by RobOIDAHO » Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:59 pm

Rob O here I do ferro cement sculpture as well domes using rebar,metal lathe --The rebar is for the frame mostly--- here is my plan to address the heat ------- a dome ---- a rebar frame and or pipe -(elec con)- secured to the ground with spud links ( or rebar) on a plate with a welded female reciever -the18" plate has 3 holes to recieve the long links, then 20' dia on a tarp overlaped 2', 15 plates, 15 -- 20'tall sticks secured in the middle with female pipe on a 4'dia circle -cross tied mid way up -then first wraping srink wrap up 3' from the bottom then bring up the tarp more wrap to hold then 18" alm. foil , more wrap and foil... to secure and so on --- working up to the top. bubble wrap can be included and or othr medias and mabye more foil and wrap....... 2 curved ladders (home made)to get up higher reflective foil will reflect 90% pluss of the raident heat reflective foil is sold with the foam layer in it that does give some R value too the r is resistance to the heat trasfer ie glass insulation is like a batterie holds it and it slows the heat down --- 2nd law thermo dianamics heat chases cold my idea is to adress the raident heat first ---- if I were to make this perm I would metal lathe and mortar like my animal shelters any questions feel free to reply RobOin Idaho
a "reagade pagan of an eclectic sort-I am" ..... May ya all read the works of Robert Green Ingersoll"

Ruggs
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2005 12:33 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

tents

Post by Ruggs » Thu Jul 14, 2005 12:47 am

had a idea the other day... what if you cover your tent in some sort of foil, like tin foil ect, it will reflect the sun away during the day....provided you place the shiney side up of course... :roll:
Ruggs

Post Reply

Return to “Building Camps & Villages”