Dust protection for audio equipment

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mattcamp
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Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby mattcamp » Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:04 am

Not really sure if this is exactly the right forum for this but anyway,

Does anyone have any tips or a design for a playa-proven enclosure or similar to keep dust out of expensive AV equipment?

We've attempted to buy passively cooled gear wherever possible to reduce the impact of dust on moving parts but still lost one channel on our main amp last year (not necessarily killed by the dust, but it was certainly full of it).

I've been pondering something involving air filters and a fan to force some air flow through but I figure this is a problem which must have been experienced and hopefully solved many times before....

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Captain Goddammit
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby Captain Goddammit » Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:24 am

This might sound way-out, but depending on the value of your gear maybe it isn't.
You could build a well-sealed wooden box that holds al the gear, and cool it with a home window-type air conditioner.
If you're running big power you've got the electricity and those units are like $250 or so. They recirculate the air and won't blow playa dust into your gear.
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mattcamp
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby mattcamp » Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:34 am

Sadly we're a bit small for that so can't spare the power to run a real AC unit...

We normally use one 2000w generator for the sound system and a second for everything else around the camp (primarily things like power tools and a microwave oven), but that doesn't leave a huge amount spare.

We actually have a $100 AC unit we bought a few years back but it caused the generator to ramp up to full revs every time the compressor kicked in.

I'm thinking maybe the sealed wood box with some HEPA filters and a couple of fans to force air through might work though.... just a question of how much airflow I can actually get so that things don't overheat.

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Molotov
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby Molotov » Tue Jun 21, 2016 10:23 am

Simple-a homemade glove box. Adjust size as needed to accommodate your gear-could be easily built out of plywood and Plexiglas.
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some seeing eye
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby some seeing eye » Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:46 am

Do some searches on ePlaya. This has come up including for video projectors too. What equipment are you bringing?

Don't bring anything good. The dust is going to get on the circuit board, then with atmospheric moisture back home corrode.

"Small-ish particles, less than 100 to 200 nanometers, tend to dominate the total particle concentration" - http://particlecamp.org/particles-playa ... rettyPhoto. That is smaller than HEPA which is 300nm (.3 microns).

So a filter is not going to be effective.

Of course there are plenty of trust funder Funktion Ones out there.
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BBadger
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby BBadger » Tue Jun 21, 2016 3:04 pm

I don't know how much effort/expense you want to put into this, but you could set up some heat-exchanger with a sealed enclosure. There are commercial heat exchanger systems, but you could also try some DIY route. This could be made from a water-cooler setup using radiators inside with a fan to circulate air; this would be connected outside some way to cool the water. Outside, this could be a radiator, or wort chiller in a bucket of water/ice, or some evaporative coolers like a bunch of zeers (who knows?), or just a radiator in the shade or something. You could even mount CPU waterblocks to your amps if you're able.
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dustyfux
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby dustyfux » Wed Jun 29, 2016 2:46 pm

Rule 12: Don't bring shit you want to keep nice. It will get fucked up.

Build whatever. Wrap it with whatever. Take it home and blow it out with compressed air. It doesn't matter, it will die.

I cringe anytime I hear "Expensive AV equipment" and "playa" in a sentence together. Buy some used cheap equipment and leave the good shit at home.

Dazey77
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby Dazey77 » Tue Jul 25, 2017 3:53 am

For one fan cooled car amp sitting in the dust I opened it up and strapped cut motorcycle air filter foam inside it covering all the openings. Worked well but for full size units you might need a lot of foam and its possible there wont be enough space inside without touching hot components and creating a fire risk. Every unit will be different!

Rack mount kit you can start by putting it in a flight case and keeping the front of the case closed and sealing the back (with a metal rack plate) apart from a filtered air inlets and outlets and panel mount sockets for mains and signal connections. This still won't 100% seal as you will keep opening the front from time to time and dust will find its way into pots etc.

badscr
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby badscr » Fri Jul 28, 2017 5:53 am

Sealed enclosure, have to design for the Thermal dissipation. keeping equipment within operational temperature range.
Night temperatures are low so that helps you out.

Idea:
A sealed metal box and use a "air heat exchanger" with two fans setup as a closed loop. Maybe able to integrate a evaporative cooler (swamp cooler) with the outside air side for improved cooling.

(Basically a large heat sink on the inside tied to a large heat sink on the outside)

Image

Open loop, re configure duct for closed loop on below photo. vvv
Image

Image

chucked
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby chucked » Mon Nov 06, 2017 11:40 am

a bucket swamp cooler can filter out a lot of dust thanks to the water trapping it in the fiber core and then the water collects it at the bottom. it can provide a lot of cooling to your equipment as well. it consumes very little power (~20w), costs only about 80$ to build, and is easily scalable if you need more than 1. you can also use it for AC to sleep during the day, and for audio duty at night.

just a thought, not sure if ive ever seen it done on the playa. my friends who run big rigs seem to have a trailer or shiftpod with all the audio backline inside it and a 5000-20000btu air conditioner keeping things cold.

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some seeing eye
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby some seeing eye » Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:09 pm

I would strongly recommend against blowing high humidity air into audio equipment that has ever been on the playa or is on the playa. Some oxides in the dust in the presence of moisture form strong hydroxides which are corrosive. Sodium hydroxide - (lye, draino) and others are produced and result in the smell of playa dust.

Swamp coolers are great for the tent when you want some moisture in your lungs, but not for everything.
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Captain Goddammit
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Re: Dust protection for audio equipment

Postby Captain Goddammit » Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:45 pm

I strongly agree!! Playa dust + moisture = fast corrosion.
I know, I’ve driven home to the Pacific Northwest with dusty gear and vehicles.
Playa dust is like instant rust powder, just add water.
GreyCoyote: "At this rate it wont be long before he is Admiral Fukkit."
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