Will the altitude change make things explode?

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skygnome777
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Will the altitude change make things explode?

Post by skygnome777 » Sun Jul 19, 2009 12:39 pm

I read somewhere someone suggesting that a bottle of hand sanitizer should be opened, to prevent it from spilling, before driving up to the elevation which BM takes place. I've also read on the drive up you should stop and check the tire air pressure frequently.
Would this be true of moisturizers and other lotions that I will need to bring the playa?
A question I feel stupid asking, how about in my luggage when flying out there?
I've always avoided bringing shampoo and such in airplanes because I wasn't sure what would happen to it with the changing air pressure.
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Token
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Post by Token » Sun Jul 19, 2009 12:48 pm

Not only is all that true, but your ear drums and eyeballs might also explode!

Playa is at ~ 4000 feet.

Airplanes are pressurized to ~ 10000 feet equivalent.

You will be fine without taking any extra measures unless ...

... unless you have a shunt to drain fluids from a brain tumor all the way down to your large intestine. Then you may want to check the backflow valve.

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BitterDan
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Post by BitterDan » Sun Jul 19, 2009 1:04 pm

Your tires will not explode and neither will your beer cans. We've carried kegs over Donner pass at, what, 9000 feet from sea level and had no problems.
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DoriumLux
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Post by DoriumLux » Sun Jul 19, 2009 1:41 pm

Bike tires can pop if you do not let a little air out if you are driving to the playa from lower elevations. Have had it happen.

I just returned from South America three weeks ago and was at elevations of 13,500 FT. However, that is due to the fact that my starting point was much lower in elevation than my destination and not due to the flight. Some of my shampoo bottles and other liquids exploded out when I opened them but not before.

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Post by Playa Tom » Sun Jul 19, 2009 1:58 pm

Some carbonated beverages can become extra fizzy. Be careful when you open them if you wish to drink rather than wear them.

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Token
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Post by Token » Sun Jul 19, 2009 2:00 pm

Propane bottles have been known to off-gas through the safety valve ...

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fciron
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Post by fciron » Sun Jul 19, 2009 2:01 pm

It's not the elevation, but the awesome art and really fucking loud music that will make your brain explode. Also the propane. It explodes real good!

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Post by Absolut Jeenyus » Sun Jul 19, 2009 3:24 pm

DoriumLux wrote:Bike tires can pop if you do not let a little air out if you are driving to the playa from lower elevations. Have had it happen.
Oh yea sorry about that. I was going on a rampage that year and was poping everyones bike tires. My bad. :shock:
-AJ )'(

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Post by wedeliver » Sun Jul 19, 2009 3:39 pm

DoriumLux wrote:Bike tires can pop if you do not let a little air out if you are driving to the playa from lower elevations. Have had it happen.

I just returned from South America three weeks ago and was at elevations of 13,500 FT. However, that is due to the fact that my starting point was much lower in elevation than my destination and not due to the flight. Some of my shampoo bottles and other liquids exploded out when I opened them but not before.
Perhaps it might be a better idea to suggest that people check the air pressure in the bike tires when they get to BRC to see if they need to let any air out.

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Post by AntiM » Sun Jul 19, 2009 3:57 pm

Your lower altitude chip bags will look like puffy pillows.

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Post by Absolut Jeenyus » Sun Jul 19, 2009 4:20 pm

Its always a good idea to check tire pressure for long trips, especially if youare carrying a heavy load.

Funny story. About 4 years ago we were carpooling from the bay and before we came down the grade in Reno, we decided to check tire pressure. It was a little low so we decide to fill it up a bit. Well someone wasnt paying attention or something cause my boy ended up filling it too much, and the tire fuckin exploded in front of like 3 of us, our faces like 6 inches from this fuckin tire. Sounded like a damn shotgun. Then after the initial shock, we sat there for a minute and laughed it off. Ended up breaking out a 12 pak and the guitar and climbed up ontop of the moving truck and having a good time talking to all the burners who were rolling through the gas station. Had to wait till the next morning till a tire place opened and was able to deliver us a tire. Was fuckin awsome. Made the burn that much cooler.


Also for chip bags, we take a safety pin and poke like 2 tiny tiny little holes in the top of the bags. Keeps em from blowing up and keeps them fresh still...
-AJ )'(

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Post by Oldguy » Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:19 pm

I had a bike tire blow this month. 60 psi, left bike in the sun, temp. about 108. Not only was tube blown but tire was shreaded also. Elevation was about 70 feet. Blowouts can happen anywhere. I park my bikes in the shade now...
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Post by Barbie » Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:24 pm

On my from Las Vegas to LA- before I left roomate decided to air up my tires... To much air got about half way there and front tire explode when I was going abour 85mph TALK about scare the FUCK out on ME!
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Post by Playa Tom » Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:52 pm

Buy a tire pressure gauge, do not trust the one on the air hose at the gas station. Find the recommended pressure range on the sidewall of your tire. When your tires are cool check the pressure and add air if necessary. Do not worry if the pressure is higher after you have driven for a while, do not let air out of the tire, the recommended pressure is for a cool tire. Low pressure causes more blowouts and wrecks than high pressure.

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Post by skygnome777 » Sun Jul 19, 2009 6:01 pm

I'm flying from CT to LAX then driving to black rock.
I'm more concerned about stuff getting my luggage messy. I wouldn't want to arrive at burning man with my clothes pre-soaked in moisturizer. I guess I'll bag it all just in case.
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Post by motskyroonmatick » Sun Jul 19, 2009 9:03 pm

When I travel I place all explosion prone bottles and such in zip lock type bags. Any mess created is contained in side the bag.

The bike tire thing is true. I have repaired several blown tires that were inflated to capacity at near seal level and then brought to BRC. Bike pumps and tubes are cheap. Good to bring both.
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Post by ygmir » Sun Jul 19, 2009 9:21 pm

BitterDan wrote:Your tires will not explode and neither will your beer cans. We've carried kegs over Donner pass at, what, 9000 feet from sea level and had no problems.
IIRC, Donner pass is 7200' el. approx.

I've gone over many times, all sorts of vehicles, and such......
I'd guess, that, if going over that pass blows something, there was a problem anyway.....and, at play elevation, it' shouldn't really matter where you start..........

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gyre
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Post by gyre » Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:34 am

Some cheap station pumps, esp coinop have no regulation and put +100 into tires.
I saw a woman put way too much into small thin tires.
Checked and read over 85 psi.

Second time I checked, blew the end off my gauge.
Tires would have blown on a hard bump.

FYI high performance tires will take a lot of pressure.
Also good for more weight, depending on profile ratio.
Lower profile = lower weight capacity.

And they say dedicated trailer tires are worth the money.
High ratings are available even for small trailers though it may be necessary to order from tire rack, etc. for a good price.

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Deb Prothero
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Post by Deb Prothero » Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:07 am

Also I'd like to put a word in for a proper tire gauge. The one you buy for $2.99 that's made in China will fall apart the second time you use it. I'm referring to the one that looks like a pen and has a cheesy plastic gauge that pops out of the end when applied to the tire valve stem.

Spend a little more and get the real thing. A dial-type gauge gives a more reliable reading and I've had this one for three years now.

The proper psi for each tire is written on the tire. You just have to look for it. Or its in the owners manual, if you have original tires on your car.

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gyre
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Post by gyre » Mon Jul 20, 2009 3:01 am

I don't know what's on the tire but many cars have specific suggestions.
All cars are sensitive to left/right differences and incorrect front/rear differences.

Generally 35 psi is a minimum.

If you run over the maximum range, be sure you know what you are doing.
I run 45 psi cold using upsized 60 ratio H rated tires.

Most recommendations are low for comfort, but not all.
The front/ rear ratio may be critical though.

Contrary to fashion, I try to run the maximum height sidewall I can use, including for high performance.
I suggest the widest possible and the softest tread you can afford.

Someday you may need to stop.

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Post by gyre » Mon Jul 20, 2009 3:10 am

Deb Prothero wrote:Also I'd like to put a word in for a proper tire gauge. The one you buy for $2.99 that's made in China will fall apart the second time you use it. I'm referring to the one that looks like a pen and has a cheesy plastic gauge that pops out of the end when applied to the tire valve stem.

Spend a little more and get the real thing. A dial-type gauge gives a more reliable reading and I've had this one for three years now.

The proper psi for each tire is written on the tire. You just have to look for it. Or its in the owners manual, if you have original tires on your car.
While better gauges are dial or digital, there is a range of good and bad in all types.
The cylinder style has a square indicator in the better ones and even brass in some.
The better ones I've tested seemed quite accurate within the limitations of reading it.
They seem extremely robust as well.
Look for truck gauges for the better ones.
The type with the flat stick vs square is the cheapest.
Better ones are heavier.

Repeatability is the most important thing.

The better dial gauges light up and have a larger face or numbers.
Very handy to have.

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Post by Token » Mon Jul 20, 2009 9:10 am

Alright! Tire inflation thread drift.

Tires all have inflation tables. Depending on expected load, tires should be inflated to an appropriate level for optimum performance.

By law, the tire companies must only list the maximum load at maximum inflation on the tire sidewall. This does not equate to the optimal inflation for your specific vehicle.

Here is an example of the inflation tables you can find at most tire manufacturers websites:

http://www.goodyear.com/rv/pdf/rv_inflation.pdf

I'll give you an example based on two of my vehicles.

1. 3000 lb sports car.

I have tires rated for 1350LB at 50 PSI. With 4 passengers the car weight may be 3800 lb. Each tire will support 3800/4= 950 lb. This is less than the max tire rating which is good.

The car manufacturer then looked up the tire manufacturers table for load vs inflation and found that for 950 lb load each tire should be at 36PSI.

So, even though the sidewall rating is 50PSI, I should run the tire at 36PSI for my specific load.

2. My 5000 lb full sized truck

I have tires rated E for load, 3000 lb at 80PSI. If I inflate my tires to 80PSI, my truck can weigh 12000 lb and still not exceed the tire maximum load. My truck would likely pulverize from that kind of load and the suspension would be busted for good.

When I have a nice load of two folks and some camping gear, the truck is at ~ 7000 lb. I look at the table an it says 1750 lb per tire --> ~ 40 to 45 PSI.

Add a trailer and another 1000 lb --> 8000 --> 2000lb per tire --> I need ~ 50 PSI.

When I load in the extra 100 gallon of water in Reno

9000 --> 2250 lb per tire --> I need 65 PSI in the tires.


Now most of this stuff is way too nit picky for regular type travel, but when you are hauling overloaded and pulling a 7000lb trailer over them high mountains, the tire inflation makes a world of difference.

I usually run the truck at 50 PSI. If I trailer, I bump to 65 PSI.

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Post by marcgorcey » Mon Jul 20, 2009 10:21 am

Not altitude, but temperature makes gel-capsule pain relievers a poor choice. Ours melted into one bumpy mass that refused to come out of the bottle !

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Post by AntiM » Mon Jul 20, 2009 10:28 am

marcgorcey wrote:Not altitude, but temperature makes gel-capsule pain relievers a poor choice. Ours melted into one bumpy mass that refused to come out of the bottle !
For medicines: get a small cooler, the insulated lunchbox type. Keep it dry, no ice! Store your pills in it, and make sure it is always n the shade, covered by a blanket or jacket or something. Works for me.

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Post by mojo » Mon Jul 20, 2009 11:18 am

We have had bags of chips explode coming from sea level over Donner Pass.

If you are coming from LA, you may want to come up 395 instead as the 80 is a NIGHTMARE as a result of a huge construction project.
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Post by Weebdog » Tue Jul 21, 2009 10:03 pm

Pressures listed on the side of a tire are usually maximum recommended by the manufacturer. To find the correct tire pressure for your vehicle look inside the door jamb on the drivers side, and there should be a sticker listing pressures.

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Ugly Dougly
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Post by Ugly Dougly » Wed Jul 22, 2009 9:43 am

Hey, kids, fun with science!

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LostinReno
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Post by LostinReno » Wed Jul 22, 2009 11:22 am

marcgorcey wrote:Not altitude, but temperature makes gel-capsule pain relievers a poor choice. Ours melted into one bumpy mass that refused to come out of the bottle !
LMAO, we've also recently learned that gummy bears have a boiling point. I believe it's at about 105-120 degrees in the car.
As far as shampoos, etc. Zip-lock baggies are your best friend. I fly quite a bit and zip locks work great.

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Post by DoriumLux » Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:47 pm

LostinReno wrote:
marcgorcey wrote:Not altitude, but temperature makes gel-capsule pain relievers a poor choice. Ours melted into one bumpy mass that refused to come out of the bottle !
LMAO, we've also recently learned that gummy bears have a boiling point. I believe it's at about 105-120 degrees in the car.
As far as shampoos, etc. Zip-lock baggies are your best friend. I fly quite a bit and zip locks work great.
It's true. Gummy bears do have a boiling point. So be sure to leave your gummy bear chandeliers safe at home...
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Ugly Dougly
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Post by Ugly Dougly » Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:43 am

But can you make Gummy Bears explode?

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