Need advice on Leave no trace diligence

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AlexAl
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Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 10:13 am
Burning Since: 2012

Need advice on Leave no trace diligence

Post by AlexAl » Fri Jul 31, 2020 10:30 am

Hi Burners!

We are a community of friends from Russia, some of us have been at BRC for a number of times since 2012th. Now we are organising our local event. It is not a part of regional BM events, though we want to rely on and promote 10 principles throughout the event. It will happen in a beautiful river island.

Some of the organisers are looking to apply chemical insecticides (Cypermethrin) at the most crowded parts of the island (~5 acres) against mosquitos and ticks to ensure people safety and comfort while others see a violation of Leave no trace principle in that action and insist to use personal repellents.

Please advise on how the mass usage of insecticides corresponds with Leave no trace principle. Especially interested in arguments of those who think that it somehow may. Thank you!

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Popeye
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Re: Need advice on Leave no trace diligence

Post by Popeye » Fri Jul 31, 2020 12:46 pm

AlexAl wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 10:30 am
Hi Burners!

We are a community of friends from Russia, some of us have been at BRC for a number of times since 2012th. Now we are organising our local event. It is not a part of regional BM events, though we want to rely on and promote 10 principles throughout the event. It will happen in a beautiful river island.

Some of the organisers are looking to apply chemical insecticides (Cypermethrin) at the most crowded parts of the island (~5 acres) against mosquitos and ticks to ensure people safety and comfort while others see a violation of Leave no trace principle in that action and insist to use personal repellents.

Please advise on how the mass usage of insecticides corresponds with Leave no trace principle. Especially interested in arguments of those who think that it somehow may. Thank you!
Cypermethrin is effective on mosquito larva and pupae, no mention of it being effective on adults so I think you will still get bitten. It is effective against adult fleas but not juvenile or eggs and it will kill fish so maybe not the best choice on an island.
Cypermethrin is toxic to the human nervous system. Symptoms of exposure include dizziness, nausea, headaches, and seizures.

I hangs around for up to 90 days so, yes you are leaving a trace.

Before spraying pesticide I'd give everyone some Dr. Bronners and a scrub bursh and let them jump in the river. Could be fun.
“Tell me, what is it you plan to do / with your one wild and precious life?” Mary Oliver

AlexAl
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Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2020 10:13 am
Burning Since: 2012

Re: Need advice on Leave no trace diligence

Post by AlexAl » Sun Aug 02, 2020 12:27 pm

Popeye, thank you! Would highly appreciate thoughts from others.

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BBadger
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Re: Need advice on Leave no trace diligence

Post by BBadger » Sat Sep 12, 2020 3:06 pm

You should probably spray with insecticides specifically made for combatting mosquitoes (e.g. Zenivex) rather than a strong general purpose insecticide like permethrin.

Permethrin would be effective on adult mosquitoes, killing them on contact. However, it will also kill other insects, aquatic life, and is also extremely toxic to cats, acting like a nerve agent.

I would encourage participants to use personal insect repellent rather than wipe out the ecosystem of the island for their temporary comfort.

Participants can soak clothing or tents in permethrin if they wish, and it'll last for weeks if you're out somewhere like Vietnam. That, along with spray repellents like DEET may be enough.

Also note that spraying something like permethrin won't prevent mosquitoes from flying into the area and attacking residents. You'll probably want something like a fogging insecticide and maybe something to knock out the larvae some weeks prior if you want to control the mosquito populations.

The best bet for participants is to use repellent on themselves and their own equipment.
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Canoe
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Re: Need advice on Leave no trace diligence

Post by Canoe » Sat Sep 12, 2020 8:27 pm

Keeping arms & legs covered, closed at wrists and ankles, and a personal deterrent of one's choice. Much nicer than discovering that you've been treated with something hazardous without your knowledge nor consent.

I've had success in Canadian cottage country, forests & canoe routes, taking Vitamin B Complex supplements to change one's scent (regular daily recommendation, typically one a day), so you get left alone while others get targeted by the mosquitoes. Warning: others notice if they're getting frequent bites and you only get an occasional bite. Someone who is slapping themselves every few seconds when bit will not take kindly to: "Damn!" "What?" "One landed on me". If you're in a canoe, prepared to duck a paddle swing. For myself, it had the same effect with Deer Flies and Horse Flies, but not as much benefit with the tiny no-see-ums. Bring enough to share. It's still effective at reducing frequency of bites if everyone present is taking a B complex, but not effective as when there's someone who hasn't... And there's usually someone in the group for whom it doesn't work as well as it does for others, which is a benefit for the others, which is not appreciated by the one.
I don't know if the B complex helped while I was in Africa. Neither I nor others got malaria, but in one area the guide did.

Takes more time, but there are traps made DIY out of old tires with water and a floating egg laying surface (paper), that are used to attract females to lay their eggs. Then a human removes and destroys the eggs. The more females visit the trap, the more it has a scent that says "lay here". Google. Effective to reduce a population around a number of houses or village over time. More traps, more benefit.

Netting is often key to prevent bites while sleeping.
Further to that, netting treated with an agent (I thought was Permethrin), is effective while sleeping and in reducing the population in the house/shelter by killing those mosquitoes that touch it. (I think a treated net's treatment is effective for two years?) This also helps reduce the mosquito population in the village, as those females trying to feed die from landing on a treated net, and more so as more houses use treated nets. Studies have determined what percentage of usage provides what reduction in local mosquito population. But, people, particularly children (pregnant?, nursing?), should minimize direct contact with netting treated with Permethrin while sleeping.

There are immediate kill traps, that emit CO2 to attract mosquitoes, and are usually very effective, if somewhat costly. They kill them, but they also attract them. But a gathering of people will be emitting CO2 that will be attracting them anyways.
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