What are you reading?

All things outside of Burning Man.
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robbidobbs
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by robbidobbs » Sun Feb 15, 2015 9:29 pm

I stopped at "learn people's names".
Non-starter.
Hence the button"WTF is your name?"

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by BoyScoutGirl » Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:30 pm

Listen: Billy Pilgrim has come unstuck in time."
Image
When he lights his streetlamp, it is as if he brought one more star to life, or one flower.
When he puts out his lamp, he sends the flower, or the star, to sleep.
That is a beautiful occupation.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Lonesomebri » Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:39 pm

Evening-Reader-ER762-1964-600x893.jpg
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by theCryptofishist » Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:42 pm

That's one of those fancy, two=toned women.
The Lady with a Lamprey

"The powerful are exploiting people, art and ideas, and this leads to us plebes debating how to best ration ice.
Man, no wonder they always win....." Lonesomebri

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by robbidobbs » Tue Apr 14, 2015 3:15 pm

Power of Now
Ekhart Tolle.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Lonesomebri » Sat May 16, 2015 6:54 pm

CanineMystery.jpg
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Mon May 18, 2015 10:53 am

"Grierson's Raid" by Dee Brown.

Same author that wrote "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee". Different story entirely. Still true. A music teacher who didn't like horses enlists in Illinois and winds up in the cavalry. 1863 - Grierson left Union lines at La Grange, Tennessee, and went on a 700 mile ride through Mississippi, disrupting Confederate communications and railroads, ending up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana safe inside Union lines again. The diversion was just enough for US Grant's corps to cross the Mississippi River and encircle Vicksburg. Vicksburg surrendered in July. Grierson stayed in the army, eventually rising to the rank of Major General, as he led the famed U.S. 10th Cavalry, the 'Buffalo Soldiers', that captured both Geronimo and Cochise and ended the war against the Apache.

Not bad for a horse-hater.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by theCryptofishist » Wed May 20, 2015 8:16 pm

The Last Stand
The Lady with a Lamprey

"The powerful are exploiting people, art and ideas, and this leads to us plebes debating how to best ration ice.
Man, no wonder they always win....." Lonesomebri

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by minnow » Tue May 26, 2015 9:03 pm

51jRcEpnfZL.jpg
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Tue Jun 09, 2015 8:39 pm

theCryptofishist wrote:The Last Stand

Fishy, you mean Custer?
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by FIGJAM » Wed Jun 10, 2015 10:42 am

I think it's about "Oasis 29"!!! :lol:
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by jeanerz66 » Wed Jun 10, 2015 11:03 am

Just finished "Reconstructing Amelia" by Kimberley McCreight and just started "Paint It Black" by Janet Fitch. I like them dark books.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by BoyScoutGirl » Wed Jun 10, 2015 10:14 pm

Even more Stephen King. He's definitely my go-to author when I want an absorbing story.

Image
When he lights his streetlamp, it is as if he brought one more star to life, or one flower.
When he puts out his lamp, he sends the flower, or the star, to sleep.
That is a beautiful occupation.

- Le Petit Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Fri Jun 12, 2015 11:27 am

FIGJAM wrote:I think it's about "Oasis 29"!!! :lol:
They actually replaced the new stand that got nailed by the semi with the old one.\

Latest read: "Dry Bones" by Craig Allen Johnson. Another winner for Johnson. Sheriff Longmire is back in Absaroka County seeking justice for a murder victim. Snappy dialogue that doesn't quit, and a story that is rock-solid.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Elliot » Fri Jun 12, 2015 1:38 pm

Selected Lives by Plutarch. As the title suggests, this edition contains a sampling of the biographies that make up Plutarch's best know work; Lives Of The Noble Greeks and Romans, also known as Parallel Lives, or simply Plutarch's Lives.

Plutarch was a Greek historian who lived in the 1st century AD. Most of the biographies are arranged in pairs, comparing one Greek and one Roman. The comparisons are sometimes strained, but the biographies themselves are fascinating. This is some of the best information we have about people like Julius Caesar, Alexander The Great, Cicero, and Demosthenes.

This edition is translated to modern English, and while there are quite a few "begats" and endless run-on sentences in the style of those days, it is perfectly readable. I'm now keeping an eye out for the complete Plutarch's Lives and his other works. No thrift store is safe.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Fri Jun 12, 2015 7:38 pm

Elliot wrote: No thrift store is safe.
THAT's the burner spirit!
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by danibel » Fri Jun 12, 2015 8:27 pm

The Casual Vacancy just showed up in my mailbox from eBay. I am looking forward to it.
In dust we trust.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by theCryptofishist » Tue Jun 30, 2015 12:59 pm

^Rhino! wrote:
theCryptofishist wrote:The Last Stand

Fishy, you mean Custer?
That's the one. Although the author also talks about it being the last stand of the Cheyenne and Sioux cultures, too. After that, they all ended up on reservations... (or dead. Dead was a popular option.)
The Lady with a Lamprey

"The powerful are exploiting people, art and ideas, and this leads to us plebes debating how to best ration ice.
Man, no wonder they always win....." Lonesomebri

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Tue Jun 30, 2015 8:39 pm

theCryptofishist wrote:
^Rhino! wrote:
theCryptofishist wrote:The Last Stand

Fishy, you mean Custer?
That's the one. Although the author also talks about it being the last stand of the Cheyenne and Sioux cultures, too. After that, they all ended up on reservations... (or dead. Dead was a popular option.)
And yet, above all we need to remember this important wisdom:

"Warriors are not what you think of a warriors,
the warrior is not someone who fights,
because no one has the right to take another life.
The warrior, for us, is one who
sacrifices himself for the good of others.
His task is to take care of the elderly, the defenseless,
those who can not provide for themselves, and above all,
the children, the future of humanity."
-Sitting Bull
(Tatanka Iyotonka)

Wisdom to reflect on and embrace.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Elliot » Wed Oct 19, 2016 2:32 pm

Whoa! Most recent post over a year ago?! Nobody reads anymore?

At the Edge of the Precipice
Henry Clay and the Compromise that Saved the Union

(2010)
by Robert V. Remini

This is history, and important history. Seems Congressman and Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky almost certainly prevented civil war by orchestrating The Compromise of 1850. The fine art of successful compromise is when both parties win more than they concede.
Alas, he died in 1852 and the American Civil War broke out in 1861.
But if the war had began in 1850, the better armed Confederacy would quite likely have won.

Reading this makes me wonder.... If that had happened, what would North America have looked like today?
Are there any novels or scholarly books exploring this?

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Ratty » Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:50 am

Recently? I am pilgrim, A wanted Man, Into Thin Air and currently Gone Girl. Into Thin Air by Krakauer was disturbing. 'A personal account of the 1996 Mt Everest disaster'.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Tue Nov 01, 2016 4:05 pm

Elliot wrote:Whoa! Most recent post over a year ago?! Nobody reads anymore?

At the Edge of the Precipice
Henry Clay and the Compromise that Saved the Union

(2010)
by Robert V. Remini

This is history, and important history. Seems Congressman and Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky almost certainly prevented civil war by orchestrating The Compromise of 1850. The fine art of successful compromise is when both parties win more than they concede.
Alas, he died in 1852 and the American Civil War broke out in 1861.
But if the war had began in 1850, the better armed Confederacy would quite likely have won.

Reading this makes me wonder.... If that had happened, what would North America have looked like today?
Are there any novels or scholarly books exploring this?
The Confederacy was doomed from the start.

Superior engineering was what got them. I just finished Thomas Army's book 'Engineering Victory: Why the south lost the Civil War." (johns Hopkins press, 2015). Ever wondered where the phrase 'Yankee ingenuity" came from? The South had to buy things from abroad like the LeMat revolver (ever hear of it? Longstreet and Beauregard both owned one - it holds 9 regular .46 cal rounds and a 20 gauge smoothbore shotgun in a second barrel.) The Sharps .45-70 (Union) was where the term 'sharpshooter' came from. And then there's the Spencer carbine, where a soldier could fire multiple times without having to ramrod and load like with the Springfield rifle. Just think, the Gatling gun was invented in 1863 by Richard Gatling, and nearly never used by the US Army. That would have mowed down Confederates. The concept of the Gatling survives into the modern day with the Phalanx system on board most guided missle ships....computer controlled and aimed, it can shoot down antiship missiles in midfight.

The South didn't have the educational resources, either. The Lyceum movement in the North spawned waves of innovation that trickled down to the south, but the south never had but a few innovators in manufacturing. Plus they had already started common schools in the 1820s.

Plus, more railroad hardware and miles of track.

I could go on.

I also finished reading Craig Allen Johnson's latest novel with Sheriff Longmire, called "An Obvious Fact" .

Mainly now, though, I'm reading about my dissertation topics and class work.

Love you guys.

Back to lurking, but I couldn't let Elliott and Ratty go without a big Hello!
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Elliot » Tue Nov 01, 2016 10:34 pm

Yes, indeed. In "Henry Clay..." author Remini points out that the Union used the "extra" decade to prepare for the still-expected war. Of course, the general industrialization of the North was the main component of that preparation, just as you say.

One decade. A mere decade. From likely loser (as per Remini) to sure-fire [ :wink: ] winner. Industrialization.

But... most important.... What we can learn from this of men and their minds.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by lucky420 » Wed Nov 02, 2016 5:57 am

Just finished Flowers for Algernon
Oh my god, it's HUGE!

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Wed Nov 02, 2016 7:50 am

Elliot wrote:Yes, indeed. In "Henry Clay..." author Remini points out that the Union used the "extra" decade to prepare for the still-expected war. Of course, the general industrialization of the North was the main component of that preparation, just as you say.

One decade. A mere decade. From likely loser (as per Remini) to sure-fire [ :wink: ] winner. Industrialization.

But... most important.... What we can learn from this of men and their minds.

One decade? I think it took longer than that to really put the South behind the 8-ball.

I will answer your second question, though, of "What can we learn from this of men and their minds?"

First of all, we can learn what it means to make amends for your mistakes.

Brig. Gen. (CSA) Joseph Orville (J.O., or "Jo") Shelby never surrendered to Union troops. Yet, he always conducted himself and his men with the highest ethical principles, not allowing looting or plundering which was so common among guerilla fighters. When the South surrendered, Shelby left the US and went to Mexico. Pardoned in the blanket amnesty granted by President Andrew Johnson, he came back to the US, eventually being nominated and confirmed as US Marshal for the Western District of Missouri. He admitted that slavery was wrong when later interviewed, and he was wrong to fight for the Confederacy. Shelby was a slaveholder himself before the war.
Interested in more?

Let me know.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Elliot » Wed Nov 02, 2016 3:50 pm

Many of us find ourselves -- by birth, economic necessity, or otherwise -- in situations we do not approve of. Thomas Jefferson owned slaves, even though he understood that slavery was an evil. It was simply not realistic to let plantations go to weed while they worked to change the system.

Yes, admitting and addressing one's mistakes is a laudable trait indeed.

Even the wisest can only do the best they know how at any given time.

California's Governor Brown is in that situation right now. Years ago, he promoted a new law, and it was enacted. Now he is working to essentially repeal it, and he readily says he made a mistake based on the best information available at the time.

Similarly, years ago I voted in favor of the death penalty. Now, older wiser and better informed, I'm voting against it.

We could expand this indefinitely. :lol:
Maybe when we run out of things to do, in days that are always too short, which I'm in no danger of.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Fri Nov 04, 2016 10:27 am

Elliot wrote:Many of us find ourselves -- by birth, economic necessity, or otherwise -- in situations we do not approve of. Thomas Jefferson owned slaves, even though he understood that slavery was an evil. It was simply not realistic to let plantations go to weed while they worked to change the system.

Yes, admitting and addressing one's mistakes is a laudable trait indeed.

Even the wisest can only do the best they know how at any given time.

California's Governor Brown is in that situation right now. Years ago, he promoted a new law, and it was enacted. Now he is working to essentially repeal it, and he readily says he made a mistake based on the best information available at the time.

Similarly, years ago I voted in favor of the death penalty. Now, older wiser and better informed, I'm voting against it.

We could expand this indefinitely. :lol:
Maybe when we run out of things to do, in days that are always too short, which I'm in no danger of.
Yep. And, in the meantime I'll read 'Wait for Signs", a collection of short stories by Craig Allen Johnson. "Divorce Horse" or "Old Indian Trick" are two of my favorites.

Laughter writ large. Boy howdy.
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I'm here until the serendipitous synchronicity is ubiquitous.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Elliot » Fri Nov 04, 2016 10:40 am

Hmmmm....
Humor from the Old West?....
May I suggest Mark Twain's Roughing it. His vivid -- to put it mildly -- description of a running coyote... just might be my all time favorite passage in any book I have read.

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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Ratty » Fri Nov 04, 2016 11:38 pm

As it turned out Gone Girl was disturbing too. Started out so slow I almost gave up. I'm picky about my steamy sex scenes. They hardly ever get it right.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by ^Rhino! » Mon Nov 07, 2016 7:36 am

Elliot wrote:Hmmmm....
Humor from the Old West?....
May I suggest Mark Twain's Roughing it. His vivid -- to put it mildly -- description of a running coyote... just might be my all time favorite passage in any book I have read.
**Rhino encourages the gathered throng to give Elliot a standing ovation, cheering wildly at Ellot's timely suggestion**

Take a bow, Elliot.

I bought that book to continue my education regarding the West, and ended up with much more that I bargained for. It's true literature, plain and simple. I loved it. He described the "Washoe Zephyr", a 'truly Scriptural wind', as one which disassembles buildings, blows people and cattle over, and raises enormous clouds of dust, in a true Midwestern 'tall tales' form that was a pure joy to read and reread:

"Still, there were sights to be seen which were not wholly uninteresting to new comers; for the vast dust cloud was thickly freckled with things strange to the upper air--things living and dead, that flitted hither and thither, going and coming, appearing and disappearing among the rolling billows of dust--hats, chickens and parasols sailing in the remote heavens; blankets, tin signs, sage-brush and shingles a shade lower; door-mats and buffalo robes lower still; shovels and coal scuttles on the next grade; glass doors, cats and little children on the next; disrupted lumber yards, light buggies and wheelbarrows on the next; and down only thirty or forty feet above ground was a scurrying storm of emigrating roofs and vacant lots.

It was something to see that much. I could have seen more, if I could have kept the dust out of my eyes.

But seriously a Washoe wind is by no means a trifling matter. It blows flimsy houses down, lifts shingle roofs occasionally, rolls up tin ones like sheet music, now and then blows a stage coach over and spills the passengers; and tradition says the reason there are so many bald people there, is, that the wind blows the hair off their heads while they are looking skyward after their hats. Carson streets seldom look inactive on Summer afternoons, because there are so many citizens skipping around their escaping hats, like chambermaids trying to head off a spider.

The "Washoe Zephyr" (Washoe is a pet nickname for Nevada) is a peculiar Scriptural wind, in that no man knoweth "whence it cometh." That is to say, where it originates. It comes right over the mountains from the West, but when one crosses the ridge he does not find any of it on the other side! It probably is manufactured on the mountain-top for the occasion, and starts from there. It is a pretty regular wind, in the summer time. Its office hours are from two in the afternoon till two the next morning; and anybody venturing abroad during those twelve hours needs to allow for the wind or he will bring up a mile or two to leeward of the point he is aiming at. And yet the first complaint a Washoe visitor to San Francisco makes, is that the sea winds blow so, there! There is a good deal of human nature in that."


I could not stop myself from sharing the joy.

Twain has always been a favorite. Chapter 12, 'The Cat and the Painkiller' in The adventures of Tom Sawyer still leaves me giggling for the acrobatics the cat performs.

Twain was a wordsmith of high order, to be sure.
Rue Morgue - '08, '09
Black Rock Beacon - '2010, 2012-2016
(lux, veritas, lardum)
Bacon is forever. Veni, vidi, pertudi. (We came, we saw, we DRILLED.) - BRC Div. of Geology 2009-2015
I'm here until the serendipitous synchronicity is ubiquitous.

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