The Car Thread

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Captain Goddammit
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Captain Goddammit » Fri May 01, 2015 12:01 pm

I have a parts truck... I'm considering swapping hoods for the BM trip and generously ventilating the temporary replacement.
Or maybe I'll do like the VW Bug guys and elevate my hood at the hinges to allow more hot air out, unless it looks too junky when I try it.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Elliot » Fri May 01, 2015 3:51 pm

Keep in mind that the area toward the windshield is a high pressure area, suitable for taking air in, but not for letting it out. Ventilating the rear of the hood might help by letting air in, to flow down and out under the car. But that depends on what goes on in the way of air flows and air pressures under the car, which is "Greek" to me.

The front of the hood is a low pressure area, but it would require some fancy ducting to take advantage of it.

Besides, we tend to have the worst overheating when we are moving slowly up a hill, where the fan is pretty much the only game in town.
That brings us to the old trick of replacing the fan clutch with a solid spacer. It won't help much, but I suppose it might help a little bit, by having the fan going full speed already when the water-thermostat reaches all the way open (as opposed to waiting for the fan-thermostat to kick in).

What else.... Oh, a clean radiator. Inside, I mean. If it is old, it may need "boiling out" or "rodding out", or replacement. Do not buy a cheap Chinese radiator. This is no place to skimp.

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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Captain Goddammit » Fri May 01, 2015 3:54 pm

I have my stock fan and electric fans too. I'm thinking of adding another electric fan or two just to evacuate the engine compartment when pulling hard at low speed up the hills.
It's ALL about the cooling.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ygmir » Fri May 01, 2015 5:01 pm

I run a cup or so of soluble oil in all my radiators. Keeps the inside of the radiator and stuff super clean, and helps water pumps last longer. An old friend who had tow trucks told me that trick and he was frugal and smart, so did the math to know, and put tons of hard miles on those old trucks........
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Elliot » Fri May 01, 2015 5:28 pm

I think I have seen products labeled for that purpose. Water Pump Lubricant.
But do not add any kind of "normal" oil to the coolant! Water-soluble oil is a very different critter, used for special purposes such as cooling-fluid in machine-work (cutting of steel).

And then.... There is a radiator additive called Water Wetter. It makes water "more wet". That is, it increases water's ability to transfer heat. I'm pretty sure it works, because some forms of auto racing require it, to minimize trouble with overheating cars on the track. So add that to your arsenal.

And now we are at the question: Should you have anti-freeze in the water? Manufacturers tend to say that a 50/50 mixture will cool best, but hot-rodders tend to scoff at that, preferring plain water plus Water Wetter. Opinions? Facts?

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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Captain Goddammit » Fri May 01, 2015 5:49 pm

Water has a higher specific gravity and is a superior coolant, as far as I know, but the antifreeze adds other good properties and if your cooling system is up to the task, I don't see why not to use it. But I live in a place that sees freezing weather in winter.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ygmir » Fri May 01, 2015 7:45 pm

water is the best coolant. but coolant only. Antifreeze, is also anti boil, and a big deal about over heating is boiling, because at that point, there is vapor, not liquid, against metal parts on a microscopic level, allowing tempts to soar. So, you sacrifice some cooling capacity for higher temps allowable. It's also why pressure caps exist. Pressure raised boiling point.

IIRC
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ranger magnum » Fri May 01, 2015 10:58 pm

The best coolant is water. But it boils at 212°. Every pound of pressure raises the boiling point about 3°
Coolant also raises ths boiling point, but also decreases the waters efficiency.
In areas that don't see sustained freezing temps (like the coastal areas of socal) a 10 percent ratio of coolant to water is more than enough.

As a former professional motorcycle racer, and in later years racecar driver (2x spec miata champion) it was my opinion that water wetter had no added cooling effect on my machines. There are a number of forums that discuss this in great detail, so I won't bother with the minutia here, but if you want some neat info google it. It's basically silicone (polysiloxane polymer), and after repeated heat cycles starts to coat the inside of the radiator with a brown coating.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Elliot » Tue May 05, 2015 6:25 pm

Next question.
My 1998 Dodge Dakota with the 318/5.2 V8 has been slowly but surely developing a hot start -- heat soak -- deficiency. It behaves much like the notorious Chevy starter -- stop in at the Post Office for five minutes, and it goes "uuugh..." and rotation more or less stops. So far, it has always "recovered" and started the engine a split second later, but this is not a lasting proposition. When not in a heat soak situation, it starts close to normally.

I replaced the starter some years ago, but seem to have failed to file the receipt.

The question is: Looking at two auto parts stores' websites, there are both "wound field" and "permanent magnet" starters available for this engine. I understand what these are. But which should I buy? Googling a bit, it seems that permanent magnet is the way to go these days. Opinions? Knowledge?

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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Jackass » Tue May 05, 2015 6:34 pm

Mosey on down to your local friendly auto parts store, ask for starter for said vehicle, purchase starter, install and enjoy. The one they have in stock is the one you need. You can thank me later...
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Captain Goddammit » Tue May 05, 2015 7:01 pm

Elliot I'm sure you know most starters from the auto parts joints aren't exactly up to real OE quality.
And Jackass, your point is valid when broken down on the road far from home, otherwise (game show wrong-answer buzzer)!!

I'm not sure which one I'd get, but if it's got the solenoid on it like a GM (I'm a bit rusty on the Mopar finer details) I'd definitely do the Ford solenoid trick on it.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Elliot » Tue May 05, 2015 7:23 pm

Yes, I am a big fan of the traditional Ford relay. But this starter worked fine for many years, including heat soak. So the starter is definitely fading -- unless there is a corroding connection somewhere. Battery is almost new; charging voltage normal.

Jackass... the issue is that the local O'Riley carries both a wound field coil version and a permanent magnet version. So I figured I ought to make "an informed decision".

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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Jackass » Tue May 05, 2015 7:34 pm

If your vehicle has a wire for a field winding then that's the one it's calling for. Check the cables real good too, sometimes the lead gets "corroded" , becomes dull and crumbly. If that's the case, shave the terminals nice and shiny again. I've seen cables and/or terminals do this exact thing on way more than one occasion...

P.S. Oreily sucks, no Napa or other parts store that supplies repair shops with real parts around there?
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Elliot » Tue May 05, 2015 7:37 pm

You are correct, Jackass, I should definitely service all connections before anything else.

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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ranger magnum » Tue May 05, 2015 9:38 pm

Most permanent magnet starters are of the gear reduction type, belting out close to 200 ft/lbs of torque. So they are overkill for anything with less than 11:1 compression.

The drawback of a pmgr starter is that they can't crank over as long as a conventional starter. But that's not usually a problem.

As was said, check all connections first. Sand them all down, and coat with dielectric tune up grease. Use the Ford solenoid trick capt mentioned.

O'Reillys sucks beyond belief. If your current starter is OEM, rebuild it.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Elliot » Wed May 06, 2015 8:25 am

From what I read, practically all starters are gear-reduction starters these days. (A Chrysler invention!)
I don't buy "real parts" -- meaning parts where quality matters -- at any store like O'Riley. I buy them at NAPA. But I mentioned O'Riley because their website demonstrated the existence of both field-coil and permanent-magnet units for my engine. Then again, the website could have it wrong. Obviously, the folks who make the website know precious little of auto parts.

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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Captain Goddammit » Wed May 06, 2015 10:09 pm

I'm not so enamored with NAPA either. Their stuff isn't always any better.
Ranger Magnum said something important not to be missed by anyone reading this: if your starter is original equipment, keep it and rebuild it, or take it to a decent auto electric shop and have them rebuild it. That's the best thing you can do short of getting another REAL factory part from the real original factory.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ^Rhino! » Thu May 07, 2015 8:13 am

Captain Goddammit wrote:I'm not so enamored with NAPA either. Their stuff isn't always any better.
Ranger Magnum said something important not to be missed by anyone reading this: if your starter is original equipment, keep it and rebuild it, or take it to a decent auto electric shop and have them rebuild it. That's the best thing you can do short of getting another REAL factory part from the real original factory.
Ranger Magnum is spot on in his praise for OEM parts. I am, too. For something simple like an air filter I've actually gone down to my local Toyota dealer to buy an extra and have it on the shelf if needed. I pack one in a giant ziploc bag and change it the minute I get off the playa and out of the dust. A coiuple of years ago I took the old one home to show people that there was a full half-cup of dust in my air filter from a trip to the playa.

Jackass is right about checking connections. The only thing out of the ordinary that I do on playa is to add two anti-corrosion felt rings to my battery terminals and scuff up the connections with a wire brush before I put the cables back on. As of this moring, ol' reliable Betsy, my 2001 Toyota Tundra P/U, has 237900 miles on it. She's on her third timing belt (replace every 100,000) and she's still capable of going 90 mph uphill. The A/C works, she's clean, and she has a brand new set of tires to boot. She's a quiet ride.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Elliot » Thu May 07, 2015 9:11 am

Oh, I agree that factory parts are usually best. But they also tend to cost an arm and a leg.
Regrettably, the current starter is not the original -- I installed a NAPA starter some years ago. (One good thing.... Replacing the starter on this model is downright easy.)

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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ranger magnum » Sat May 09, 2015 10:40 am

If my OEM part is beyond is service limits, I head to my local salvage yard and look for it. Not so easy for a vintage car, but there are still used parts out there.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ^Rhino! » Mon May 18, 2015 12:58 pm

ranger magnum wrote:If my OEM part is beyond is service limits, I head to my local salvage yard and look for it. Not so easy for a vintage car, but there are still used parts out there.

I just refuse to pay OEM prices for things like a catalytic converter. Toyota - $1500 uninstalled. Custome Muffler $800 installed, and a better quality cat converter.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ranger magnum » Tue May 19, 2015 7:41 pm

Rhino you are so right about that one.

I meant stuff like generators, starters, water pumps, wheel cylinders, and power steering pumps. Centric is one of the largest producers of aftermarket replacement parts. Their stuff is pretty good. It's the crap at auto zone that you gotta look out for.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ^Rhino! » Wed Jun 17, 2015 10:00 am

ranger magnum wrote:Rhino you are so right about that one.

I meant stuff like generators, starters, water pumps, wheel cylinders, and power steering pumps. Centric is one of the largest producers of aftermarket replacement parts. Their stuff is pretty good. It's the crap at auto zone that you gotta look out for.
Thanks for the belief in my correctness.

I quit going to Auto Zone....they never had what I needed when I needed it. O'Reilly usually does well for me. They actually got me a heater blower motor for a Honda Civic LX for me a few years back that was a champ.

Original Equipment Parts from a dealer will cost you dearly. One small piece of plastic trip cost me $35.00 when the part itself shouldn't cost more than a couple of dollars. Dealers use labor rates and parts sales to enhance their bottom line.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Captain Goddammit » Wed Jun 17, 2015 10:08 am

What I was getting at is if you can save your existing OE parts by rebuilding them (or having it done by a good place) you're usually better off than if you slap in a cheap parts-store replacement.

The maths don't always work out to go OE when replacing even though it's better because they charge so damn much.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ygmir » Wed Jun 17, 2015 1:48 pm

dang, looks like I'll have to put a new clutch in my M35. Gonna test it, but, the adjustment is all the way out, to get correct pedal.
I wish I knew a young limber/strong person I could hire for that job..........

Is there any way to nurse a worn clutch? I don't mean driving wise, but more like spraying lacquer thinner in the assembly or whatever to make things last a little longer.

I do know, it's best to fix it right, but if I could get a few more miles, and do it in the fall when things are cooler out.........
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by EspressoDude » Wed Jun 17, 2015 2:13 pm

wouldn't think you would want to spray anything on the disc, etc. that might cause the glue/binder to disintegrate

edit to add: but maybe contact cement + sand :roll:
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ^Rhino! » Wed Jun 17, 2015 3:00 pm

Captain Goddammit wrote:What I was getting at is if you can save your existing OE parts by rebuilding them (or having it done by a good place) you're usually better off than if you slap in a cheap parts-store replacement.

The maths don't always work out to go OE when replacing even though it's better because they charge so damn much.

Which is where rebuilding skills and a junkyard come in.
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by Captain Goddammit » Wed Jun 17, 2015 5:39 pm

I just pulled the trans and transfer case from my one-ton GMC to fix a similar clutch issue, then put it back in... I thought I had it bad! It's "just" an NP435 with the attached T-case, a bitch to get a jack on.

Ygmir, I did figure out a helpful thing to do: When reinstalling, run a ratchet strap over the left framerail, then down under the trans, then back up over the right framerail. Angle the strap just slightly so that the trans wants to swing forward, a little not a lot.
Jack up on the front of the trans to get the front height right and crank the strap to dial in the rear. When mine was right, it swung itself right in, fully seated! That was better than I expected and it probably won't work that well ever again, but if nothing else, it's extra insurance that it won't fall off the jack (even though I ratchet-strap to the jack) and kill me all dead and stuff.

I don't know exactly how big and heavy the trans is in an M35, maybe you could try another method I once used... roll the vehicle carefully onto it's side with boom truck, then strap around the trans, remove all the bolts (while standing comfortably!) and use the boom truck to swing the trans right out!
I did this on a vehicle that I didn't care about the body on, but if it's actually possible to gently set an M35 on it's side without damage... maybe onto a sand pile or something...
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by ygmir » Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:32 pm

well, it has about 3' of ground clearance there, too high to reach and lay down, so, I'm thinking of a bucket or some such to sit on. Gotta test drive it to see how bad it is first......*hoping*.
the strap idea sounds good, though. One guy suggested taking the floor plate that is over the trans out, and putting a 4x4 across the doors (windows down) and use a come a long.......
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Re: The Car Thread

Post by DoctorIknow » Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:57 pm

Captain Goddammit wrote:I have my stock fan and electric fans too.
I've usually made night trips from Sacramento which helps not overheating, which is a big problem from my first ride, the '40 Chevy, and since then a '91 Econoline. But, many times I've missed by depart time and have to leave in the day.

I've jury rigged a garden sprayer, removing the nozzel from the wand, added tubing, but keeping the wand in the van, as it has the trigger valve. The pressure from the hand pump lasts quite a while, and I only mist the radiator when the red line is approaching. It doesn't distract from driving, and if the pressure or water runs out, I just pull over and replenish.

The old wisdom was to speed up when overheating, and that can work from I-80 to Gerlach, but for sure it's impossible to do climbing up the hill to Donner. I've had radiator flushes, additives, antifreeze, all don't help much in my case, but the spritzing really works well.
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