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All things outside of Burning Man.
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Post by Guest » Sun Sep 07, 2003 9:42 pm

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Ivy
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Post by Ivy » Sun Sep 07, 2003 9:50 pm

Um...this may sound trite but it's not really my intention.

Buckle down and do your job, 'cause if you don't, how will you make it to BM next year?

(And don't anybody tell me they can earn the money working the the cafe...)

Seriously, unless you're independently wealthy, it's likely that you rely upon this job not only to pay your rent and electric bill, but also to fund your BM experience.

At least, that's how I get though my work day. That, and the e-playa, which i highly recommened against, becuase it's more addicting than crack.

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Post by L:Gringo » Sun Sep 07, 2003 10:00 pm

I agree, Ivy. StarBoy, knuckle down and get on with it! Remember, a big part of BurningMan is it's temporary nature. Don't get hung up thinking life should be BurningMan. Life should be life, and the lessons of BurningMan should be lived yearlong.

Glad to be back home to start working on next year's projects...

L:Gringo
We all will burn someday...

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Post by desert pearll » Sun Sep 07, 2003 10:03 pm

You're not alone. Coming back to work after
a vacation---any vacation--is difficult.
It takes time to re-adjust. The work that's piling
up and threatening to overwhelm you will get done.
Do the easiest ones first. No, wait---do the hard ones
first, get 'em outta your way.

Ah, hell, I don't know.

Just calm down, calm down, stop freaking out.
Focus on what needs to be done and do it.

And remember....Martha ain't really that ugly.

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Lydia Love
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Post by Lydia Love » Sun Sep 07, 2003 10:09 pm

Everything said above (Hi DP!) and...

promise yourself that when you get yer shit done that you'll make some time to fulfill your creative heart.

and when you do get your shit done give yourself that gift.
It's all about the squirrels.

Guest

buck up, soldier!

Post by Guest » Sun Sep 07, 2003 10:19 pm

how did you get ready to go to the playa? you probably figgered out what you needed to do, made a list, and starting crossing things off.

do the same thing now.

put on some tunes...make a list of the shit you need to get done...start doing it.

if need be, turn OFF your internet access/unplug your modem-dsl-cable, to reduce the distraction and temptation.

this is the short-term fix.

the long-term fix? bring more playa back with you next year, and the year after that, and the year after that, and the year after that. and you'll start to notice that it's a helluva lot more fun going through the days, even when you have mundane shit to do...

Guest

Post by Guest » Sun Sep 07, 2003 10:21 pm

Lydia Love wrote:promise yourself that when you get yer shit done that you'll make some time to fulfill your creative heart.

and when you do get your shit done give yourself that gift.

i second that. well put, L...

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Re: Someone please f**king help

Post by tepepinda » Sun Sep 07, 2003 11:11 pm

StarBoy wrote:dreaming up ways to bring the magic of the playa into my life here in Palm Springs, or, frankly, just feeling really farking weird, unmotivated, and now - desperate.
On the contrary; I'd say you're *highly* motivated -- just not to do the work you have set before you. I had this problem in the past as well, and (after just sucking it up in the short term and doing those ridiculous chores) I learned a great lesson: You create your own world. Burningman is so compelling and fulfilling because we all create it together, straight from our dreams and imaginations.

Well, it turns out that the whole world is like that too, just with a few more constraints (or maybe just more challenging constraints). It is possible for each of us to lead fulfilling lives in which we look forward to each day -- but nobody's going to set up those lives for us. We need to do it for ourselves, and it can be scary and hard and deeply unfulfilling along the way. But it's all worth it.

after many visits to the playa, my on-playa and off-playa lives have begun to merge, and the distinction between the two is now excitingly slight. My life has been changed by the lessons I've learned on the playa -- by the realization that living is a creative act, not a passive state.

It sounds like you're starting to realize the full implications of living your life, and I wish you all blessings should you choose to see where that path leads.

!!
~t~

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Post by Guest » Mon Sep 08, 2003 4:21 am

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Re: Someone please f**king help

Post by PJ » Mon Sep 08, 2003 6:52 am

StarBoy wrote:back in the real world...completely lost...been able to show up for my inspections...try to force myself to sit down and write the damn things up but I just can't.

This might be nature's way of telling you that you're learning just how uninteresting your career is. And that you're only doing it for the money. Of which there can never be enough to pay for the ennui. If you're like the great mass of modern humans you'll keep going back because the little pay raises each year are irresistible. But that would be wrong. Better to muddle through temporarily while thinking very very hard about finding actually satisfying work that pays the vital bills (not the fancy new car nobody really needs, etc.) Ironically, you'll probably ultimately make more money doing something truly satisfying anyway.

I've had shitty jobs, jobs in what most people might think is a terrible location (the South Pole), jobs in actual terrible locations (Ogden, Utah), jobs where you get shot at, and inhumanely tough jobs; any of those were preferable to a boring and repetitive job. I've had jobs so great that I'd wake up every morning excited that, once again, Oh Boy! I get to go to work! And I've had that job ruined by know-nothing MBAs that showed up one day because the company got sold. Now I work for myself--I always knew I should but it took post-B.Man feelings to make it imperative.

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The fog of bore, vaguely familiar

Post by BUCKZERO » Mon Sep 08, 2003 7:57 am

I find myself here at this website, or trying to create my own website about my experience at BM so I can show my friends...or thinking of people I could get to go with me next year...or coming up with ideas for camps/art installations

This was my 8th burn, and I still havent been able to do my reports!!!

It's hard to come back from 5-15 days of sleep depravation, physical and psychological damage. I tend to have problems getting back into the groove(even though I don't have a job) If your like the other 29,000+ who stay up all night, treat your body like crap and drain your head of seratonin and other chems on the playa, well....Sorry.

Replenish your body, take it easy and STAY AWAY from the BB until your done with work. General aspects of life like work arent as exciting as smacking rebar into alkalai. You'll do just fine...take it from me, I havent worked since this goddamned Burningman started keeping up at night.

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Post by blyslv » Mon Sep 08, 2003 8:12 am

What tepepinda said!

The post-Christmas letdown is tough, and the higher the climb it seems the deeper the crash. I lucked out. My first day in back in town I was able to get invovled in a pretty encompassing creative project with a group of people, and that gives me something to look forward to. I'm still a bit ragged, I took two naps on Sat. and one on Sunday and boy! are my eyelids tired. But the real key is keeping the spirit of what drew you to the Burn alive, whatever that is. And whatever it is, you can be sure that it will involve a hell of a lot of work. Think of those damm reports as the stakes that hold up your bee-yoo-ti-ful shade structure (can you say "pollyanna"?) You are by no means alone. And now to work on what PJ said...
Fight for the fifth freedom!

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Post by Guest » Mon Sep 08, 2003 8:33 am

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ubu
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Post by ubu » Mon Sep 08, 2003 11:07 am

how about quitting your job and seeing what happens?

I went straight to work after the burn and even though I like and enjoy what I do, I still kind of floated through last week, mostly giggling at the silliness of even having to make money.

It is interesting to note the people who suggested that you knuckle down and do your work so you can make it to the next burn. today is the next burn. why wait. slow down, do what you want to do today and you'll never need to go to another burn in black rock city.

my favorite ginsburg line goes, "because it is not necessary, it is ok to do it." when burning man is not necessary, then go again. if it is still necessary, go out on a limb and quit your job if you can.

Let yourself freak out. let yourself be down if you are down. that seems to work for me.

I went to a few parties this weekend that were extensions of burning man, with lots of folks who had just gotten back from the burn, including a 30k plus gathering in golden gate park, and a no holds barred party at hunters point. the porn clowns were there, doing their thing.

I don't know if i'd even call these decompression parties, the distinctions are so blurry.

I think Larry is right; It's time to start spreading the ingenuity, the creativity, etc. into more areas than just a week a year gathering.

Be true to your own feelings. If you don't feel like working, then don't to the degree that you are willing to risk it!

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Post by PJ » Mon Sep 08, 2003 11:15 am

ubu wrote:how about quitting your job and seeing what happens?

It is interesting to note the people who suggested that you knuckle down and do your work so you can make it to the next burn. Today is the next burn.
Well-said.

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Post by Ivy » Mon Sep 08, 2003 11:41 am

how about quitting your job and seeing what happens?
You gonna support me?

Freedom is, IMO, an interesting thing. It's not really the ability to "be free" do what you want whenever you want. It's the ability to make choices. Basically, it comes down to priorities. I choose to work my job so I can eat, have a decent place to live, transportation, and yes (gasp!) money to buy a ticket for next year's burn.
I could just as easily choose not put other, different things as priorities in my life. I could, for example, choose a ticket to Austrailia over a ticket to BM. I can choose not to spend my money on food or rent, but rather on drugs or horse racing bets. These are all things i am free to do.
Yes, I am free to quit my job. But I ahppen to like the lifestyle it affords me to lead (which, contrary tot he general demographic of BM, ain't much) and without it, for me there would be no BM.
I do try to live as though I were at BM everyday. I try to pick up MOOP and be friendly to people and create beautiful things.

The posted asked for helping in getting his work done, not how to feel the burn 365. I think it's clear from hsi posts that it sits strongly in him. I assume that if could quit his job, he probably already would have. Ia ssume that he, like a lot of us, do need that job in order to make it to the next burn, the decompression, even the BBQ down the street.

I'm sorry but I'm just a little sick of "quitting your job" always being the easy answer.

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Post by TestesInSac » Mon Sep 08, 2003 11:48 am

Having been raised in it as few Americans ever get to experience it, I know:

<b>Poverty sucks!</b>

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Post by PJ » Mon Sep 08, 2003 12:22 pm

Ivy wrote:I'm sorry but I'm just a little sick of "quitting your job" always being the easy answer.
Nobody said it's an easy answer.

Someday you might arrive at work to learn that your job quit you. Work long enough and it'll happen, more nowadays than ever before. What would you do then? That's what the originator of the thread would have to do. Anybody can do it if it's foist upon them, therefore anybody can do it if they really want to and are brave. Not that everybody needs to--many people have careers they love. I feel pretty strongly that, since you spend a third of your adult life at work, it really ought to be something you like to do or it's going to affect your personality and demeanor for the worse.

Ivy wrote:You gonna support me?
Sure. In trade you can do some house cleaning, maybe some dancing a few times a year, and play with Legos from time-to-time.

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Post by PJ » Mon Sep 08, 2003 12:28 pm

casnimot wrote:<b>Poverty sucks!</b>
But learning to overcome poverty is a priceless life skill. Having been-there-survived-that, you never need to fear it again.

Most people think they'd like to be wealthy, but few have the balls to go out on a limb and take the financial/career risks it takes to get there. They're too afraid of failure to ever succeed.

The standard list of excuses includes, "Can't risk not being able to make house payments," and "Still got kids in school". Feh. I'll bet the kids would love to see you take on an adventure--finally you'll be an interesting parent. Besides, it's not like they're gonna starve to death if you fail. But maybe your golf buddies will be embarassed by your not owning a new car. Fuck 'em.

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Post by blyslv » Mon Sep 08, 2003 12:33 pm

But maybe your golf buddies will be embarassed by your not owning a new car. Fuck 'em.
Obviously you've never seen my golf buddies. I wouldn't touch them with a titanium Big Bertha![/quote]
Fight for the fifth freedom!

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Post by TestesInSac » Mon Sep 08, 2003 12:37 pm

PJ wrote:But learning to overcome poverty is a priceless life skill. Having been-there-survived-that, you never need to fear it again.
You bet! Being able to do more with less also helps me at Burning Man, too.

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Post by Ivy » Mon Sep 08, 2003 12:37 pm

Sure. In trade you can do some house cleaning, maybe some dancing a few times a year, and play with Legos from time-to-time.
You're on! I've even got it in writing.

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Post by Guest » Mon Sep 08, 2003 12:40 pm

PJ wrote:Most people think they'd like to be [wealthy], but few have the balls to go out on a limb and take the [financial/career] risks it takes to get there. They're too afraid of failure to ever succeed.
can replace the things in []'s with a lot of things.

art
relationships
being physically healthy
etc..."Certainly the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you; if you don't bet, you can't win."

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Post by bradDaDad » Mon Sep 08, 2003 5:35 pm

You could sell your workload to another contactor and go on a long exhausting hike. Americans more than anyone else I have known need to be surrounded by things. When I was homeless, I was ecstatic not to have a lot of bullshit to deal with. I have a friend named Camper Dave. He sold his fish market to become "home free", as he called it. He kayaked and adventured constantly. He was set free because he didn't create a satelite of useless garbage floating around his stratosphere. He made many of the rules that used to be made for him. Is this ideal? I don't know, probably not.

There are minimalist backpackers, many of them hike the AT or PCT trails from start to finish with a couple of thousand dollars, five months time at their disposal, and a total pack weight of 25 or so lbs. The weight reduction is the key point here. MUCH can be learned from these ultalight backpackers about survival. The PCT trail runs through desert, so the hikers that have done that know a bit about hot weather survival.

There are many choices that don't require a lot of money. Work, yes. Money, no.

Well, who is going to correct me? hhaw bout ma spellin'.

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dasn't dare correct ye

Post by debkakes » Mon Sep 08, 2003 8:59 pm

but i will say that the life you describe is ideal for some, and not in the least desireable to others. There are ways to integrate work into life, which is what our intrepid poster is asking for help doing. I would agree with Ivy (I think??) that you should try just buckling the fuck down and getting it done. Then extending the deadlines on your next jobs, if you can, so you can catch your breath and regroup. The further from any event you get, the easier it is to process. You need more time, it seems, but not necessarily to the point of quitting your job and living in a tipi.
gotta walk thru the ouch to get to the awe

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Post by bradDaDad » Mon Sep 08, 2003 9:08 pm

Getting the work done might very well be the best thing, no doubt. I am just offering a a new perspective. Hell, if he was a web designer I would offer to help, but unfortunately I don't know anything about inspecting or whatever it was, and some might say I don't know design either.
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mind blown, cubicle does not suffice

Post by orlando » Mon Sep 08, 2003 9:09 pm

I'm a realist. I've been self employed for 10 years -- got a little burnt wnet for a 'secure' job -- worked like a dog for the man -- then got laid off three weeks before the burn.

Security is bunk.
We are devolving jobs at an alarming rate for export or robots...
Maybe that's a good thing.

Burningman cracks some of us open to our possibilities again.

Maybe this guy NEEDS to quit his job, maybe he just NEEEDS to buckle down and stretch out these strange changes WITH a job.... But there's no doubt that new worlds are opening up, possibilities, vistas and adventures that simply weren't possible before his head was cracked open. It's all good.

We make choices within constraints, but very often I've discovered those constraints were things I chose. I am 5'3" 120 -- I'll never run a 4 minute mile -- but I can ditch my car,move to a city with great public transportation and free up thousands of dollars a year for other choices...

There are processes which you can begin today to free up your life , your juicy joy....no one is gettin any younger.

www.newdream.org

( this stuff works for all kinds of income situations )

OF course YMMV.

And last but not least - WELCOME - WE SHARE YOUR ANGST! There are ways through it and to the other side. So glad you came :)

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Post by Guest » Tue Sep 09, 2003 6:39 am

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orlando
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wooo hoo

Post by orlando » Tue Sep 09, 2003 4:13 pm

good going stanboy!

when you have time tell us more about the shifts you're going through --what doyou want more of and less of in your life?

Where do you live - hooking upwith a regional is agood way to keep it juicy all year...

:D

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Post by Guest » Sun Sep 14, 2003 8:58 am

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