Why We Cry at the Temple Burn

Share your views on the policies, philosophies, and spirit of Burning Man.
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Badger
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Post by Badger » Thu Sep 30, 2004 8:42 pm

Think of the effort involved in such tombic projects as the Pyrimids and the Taj Mahal.
Excellent point.

Historians, backed by the innumerable records suggest that some of the early kings in Egypt had their graves started almost immediately at the time of their birth.

Have a look http://www.thebanmappingproject.com.

(I'm really pushing this web site BTW)
Desert dogs drink deep.

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Markov Chaney
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Post by Markov Chaney » Thu Sep 30, 2004 8:48 pm

Hell yeah!

Thanks Badger. That is a great site.

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Bob
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Post by Bob » Fri Oct 01, 2004 11:02 am

Badger wrote:The only 'agreement' that I know of is the one that suggests that no matter what you bring to BRC you should take away.
This should be a no-brainer for the hoi polloi, of which I consider myself a member... and you'd think the bigger art installations and theme camps that elicit such weepy sentiments would also generate a sufficient amount of interest in wiping them off the playa... and this isn't Egypt, where once upon a time priesthood had its privileges... but you have to wonder. I certainly wouldn't hold all the staff/volunteer camps blameless, and whomever might be considered responsible for the Cafe and the entirety of Center Camp. Quite a few people do go back up and help DPW with the general cleanup, and maybe having a DPW is part of an unavoidable social agreement -- the de facto cost of affording places for participants to come and cry, sing, dance, drop their pants & whatnot, at temple burns and shit. Responsibility seems to difuse, the more people for whom you think you're providing some sort of service.
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

"Let us say I suggest you may be human." -- Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam

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stuart
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Post by stuart » Fri Oct 01, 2004 11:29 am

so, there was that guy, in the explosion and folks were all 'yeah man, help him out. He's broke and in legal trouble and in the hospital'. I was all 'wasn't that the guy who just left his big ass sculpture out on the open playa for DPW to cart away after the event?' Not that I believe in such horseshit, but I was thinking about karma pretty hard.

please feel free to use corporal punishment if I got me facts screwy on this one.
call me baby

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theCryptofishist
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Post by theCryptofishist » Fri Oct 01, 2004 11:42 am

Badger wrote: Excellent point.
Ta
Historians, backed by the innumerable records suggest that some of the early kings in Egypt had their graves started almost immediately at the time of their birth.
I think I'd heard that in conjunction with the smallness of Tutankhanman's tomb. Or maybe it was paucity of grave goods.

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Badger
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Post by Badger » Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:10 pm

Responsibility seems to difuse, the more people for whom you think you're providing some sort of service.
Quote of the week.
Desert dogs drink deep.

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mowgli
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Post by mowgli » Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:11 pm

[quote="theCryptofishist][/quote]I don't know. Think of the effort involved in such tombic projects as the Pyrimids and the Taj Mahal. Although the 2nd only turned into a tomb during the lengthy building project.[/quote]

Did they try to burn the pyramids after they finished them? I don't recall reading bout that.

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playasnake
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Post by playasnake » Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:20 pm

you are so absolutely right.
e pluribus unimog

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theCryptofishist
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Post by theCryptofishist » Fri Oct 01, 2004 12:27 pm

mowgli wrote: And arent they usually just a bunch of sticks? Really, I dont know.
http://www.beastcoins.com/Architecture/ ... alPyre.htm
One of the most amazing architectural types on Roman Imperials is the ustrinum or "funeral pyre".

It consists of four tiers; the lowest most of which represents a plain podium with pilasters at the angles; having loosely-hanging drapery in front, with three large festoons, and the profile of a festoon at each end.

The next tier forms the sepulchral chamber for the reception of the dead body. In the center is a pair of panelled folding doors, flanked by two niches on each side with statues and surmounted by a cornice.

The tier above has five square-headed niches with statues and a cornice represented by beads; and the upper forms a lofty plain attic with hanging drapery in front, the folds of which are very marked.

A lit torch flanks each end of the upper tier, which forms a pedestal surmounted by the quadriga of the deceased, with his statue in the chariot and holding a palm leaf in his left hand. All the tiers diminish in width from the base upwards so as to assume a pyramidal form.

Marvin Tameanko, retired architect and specialist in ancient architectural coins comments:

"To cremate a body, bones and all (but not the teeth) you need lots of sustained heat. The Romans used a pyre, called a 'rogus', which was built with log cribworks, like a hollow log cabin, erected in stages, getting smaller at the top where the body was placed. The rogus was filled with straw and kindling and set alight. It acted as a chimney and funneled the heat to the top, incinerating the corpse. Herodian, the Roman historian describes the rogus in detail. After the cremation, the ashes were placed in a stone building, called a ustrinum, made to look like the wedding-cake shaped rogus or the Maussoleum of Hailcarnassus and built near the cremation site.
http://www.carpe-diem-travel-cambodia.c ... es_sb.html
The most spctacular and well-known of the temples, Angkor Wat was built during the first half of he 12th century as a funeral pyre for the god Vishnu. Covering an area of over a square kilometre, it is surrounded by a moat and approached via a huge stone walkway. The temple is comprised of three "levels", one inside the other - originally the upper level was only accessible to kings and high priests, with the middle level being designated for meditation. The first level leads to anoher stone walkway, some 350 metres long, bordered by ponds which can offer excellent reflected images of the main temple. Climb if you wish to the top level for an excellent all-round view, or explore the many passageways and small rooms.
http://www.geocities.com/reginheim/funerals.html
A good description of the cremation of a Viking king can be found in the "Risala", an account which has been written by the Arabian explorer Ibn Fahdlan, other good descriptions of cremation customs can be found in the Beowulf saga.
A dead body was laid on a pile of wood, the bodies of famous men were burned with particular types of wood but what types this were is unknown, the funeral pyre was either placed on a ship or on an altar, though this depended on tradition and location, sometimes a wagon was also used.
The dead person was then surrounded with his or her personal belongings, weapons, and some food which the person would need for his or her journey to the afterlife, after some rituals the pile was lit (in the case of a boat it was often pushed into the water after it was lit), after the funeral there was some mourning but also celebrations in honour of the deceased; too much mourning would be inappropriate since the person was now in a peaceful afterlife (Helheim) where he or she was received by friends and family members who had already passed away.
In the oldest cremations the ashes of an important person was placed in a gravehill, the ashes of less-important persons were often buried in an urn, a special type of urn was the "face-urn"; an urn with a human face on it which represented the dead person.

There were many different forms of cremation:
# cremation and placing of the ashes under a gravehill
# cremation and dispersal of the ashes
# cremation and dispersal of the ashes into water
# cremation and burial of the ashes
# cremation and placement of the ashes in an urn
# cremation and burial of the ashes in an urn
# cremation of a body and ship together
# cremation and burial of the ashes in an intact ship
Of course this are only some examples, there were many local variations of this customs.
Always watch out for local variations.

Of course, some of us are prepping for our own funerals

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playasnake
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Post by playasnake » Fri Oct 01, 2004 1:25 pm

e pluribus unimog

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theCryptofishist
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Post by theCryptofishist » Fri Oct 01, 2004 1:49 pm

Thanks playasnake.
That Noble Mole! That Gracious Mouse!

King Mole and Skee the Mouse live forever in the hearts of those who have witnessed their passings!

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Bob
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Post by Bob » Fri Oct 01, 2004 2:06 pm

No llores por mi Roca Negra
Mi alma esta contigo
Mi vida entera, te la dedico
Mas no te alejes
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

"Let us say I suggest you may be human." -- Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam

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Bob
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Post by Bob » Fri Oct 01, 2004 2:07 pm

...te necesito
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

"Let us say I suggest you may be human." -- Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam

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Isotopia
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Post by Isotopia » Fri Oct 01, 2004 4:07 pm

¿Cantado por una suma de la división de la alegría (Joy Division)?

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Bob
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Post by Bob » Fri Oct 01, 2004 4:37 pm

Lo canté, al Señorita Dubois... seguramente...
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

"Let us say I suggest you may be human." -- Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam

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geekster
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Post by geekster » Fri Oct 01, 2004 4:49 pm

Utwa rthey uckingfay alkingtay boutay.
Pabst Blue Ribbon - The beer that made Gerlach famous.

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