Whats the Deal? Trouble@Greeters Gate, Discovery Channel!?!?

Share your views on the policies, philosophies, and spirit of Burning Man.
honeyfire
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Post by honeyfire » Wed Sep 10, 2008 1:26 pm

Ah. Thank you for the clarification.
I can see, then, why you feel you are in another category than snapshotters. Not that there's anything wrong with snapshots!
And, yes, there's a big diff between burners shooting respectfully and underinformed mediadors thinking that they can do anything because they have a camera.
Indeed, it's an easy mindset to fall into, as one can get away with quite a bit out in Defaultia simply by having an impressive looking camera slung around one.
Heh, i certainly have. Backstage with no pass, here i come... *evil grin*

And yeah, banning cameras would, at best, miss the point.
It's easy for people to forget that the playa is still a *public place*, and that when we are in public, we may be photographed, especially if we go to special pains to look special. *smile*
Even out in the world, i almost always ask before shooting pix of people, and (other than crowd scenes) i will almost always show the pix to the subjects and let them veto the shots. It's one of the things i LOVE about digital: in-camera editing. Bad (or unwelcome) shot? Delete! *grin*

As for me, i do occasionally paint, and sometimes draw, but for straight image art, the camera is where it's at for me...
I'm just trying not to be liveMOOP...

Civil rights: use 'em or lose 'em!

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julie_c
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Post by julie_c » Wed Sep 10, 2008 1:38 pm

Coyote88
Amen brother, preach!
took me 5years to figure out what you did in one...but then a few years back the idea was still somewhat in existence!

Toolmaker
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Post by Toolmaker » Wed Sep 10, 2008 3:38 pm

Here is an example of what "naughty" media does to our community.
The Wall Street Journals Travis Kavulla wrote: Desert Wanderers Find Their Promised Land

So bizarre, so immense is the Burning Man Festival that it is, as its adherents take pride in claiming, a difficult thing to describe. But let me try. Annually, during the last week of August, some 50,000 people descend upon Nevada's remote Black Rock Desert, 110 miles north of Reno -- the type of place that gives meaning to the idiom "middle of nowhere." There they engage in a weeklong bacchanal that mixes Woodstock with Mad Max and, in toto, resembles a kind of surreal, sprawling state fair.

Burning Man is not for the timid. The camping conditions are horrible; daytime temperatures reach well over 90 degrees Fahrenheit, and two eight-hour dust storms struck during the course of this year's festival, reducing visibility to 10 feet and covering everything with silt. Public nudity is in vogue, and the practice of toplessness (and sometimes bottomlessness) extends from small-town teenage girls -- one was seen calling out, loudly, for the services of a body-painter -- to the 60-somethings clutching each other in a fully nude embrace at the "Polyamory Paradise" camp. Finally, the place is utterly saturated with drugs. Everything is available, from alcohol and cannabis to Ecstasy and research chemicals with names like 2C-I.

Uncomfortable with at least a few of Burning Man's debaucheries, but curious about this fabled slice of the American counterculture, I decided to go, joining a camp that included two semi-itinerant Wesleyan grads, a McKinsey consultant, the daughter of a British peer and an editor of National Review. Burning Man lures some very strange types to its brand of escapism, but they are strange affluent types.

After entering the festival gates, one passes into a demonetized society where the rides on the giant seesaws, the rounds of miniature golf, the costumes, the body-paint jobs and everything else are dished out gratis. Still, merely to participate in this bout of unreality comes with a high price tag. Gate admission is $295, and the rental RVs in which many "Burners" stay go for $2,500 for the week. And then there is the cost of airfare, gas, food and other substances. Flying from Montana, staying in a tent and splitting expenses, I spent just north of $1,000.

At the beginning of its 22-year history, Burning Man was a small and informal affair featuring self-described "redneck" libertines. Now it is an intricately planned 168-hour-long rave. The demographic of those who attend these days became obvious while I gambled in my Reno hotel-casino, awaiting the arrival of the biofuels bus that would take me into the desert for $78, one way. Next to me at the roulette table, it turned out, was another Burner, still in civilian garb. Rather outdoing my $5 wagers, he was betting recklessly. But he won big and walked away from the table $20,000 richer.

This introduction to Burning Man was apropos of the festival's many internal tensions. It is a society that prides itself on a back-to-nature freedom, but it caters to people who will go back to the office when the festival is over. It is also flavored by the fashionable environmentalism of the West Coast, even though the festival, because of its far-flung location, has an appallingly large carbon footprint. Last year's festival theme was environmental sustainability -- "The Green Man," as it was called. But when asked about the seeming contradiction between that environmental motif and Burning Man's consumption, many of the people who attended last year seemed to believe that, regardless of what they were actually doing, the event had at least "raised consciousness" about the ecosystem.

This year's festival was styled "The American Dream," and various, occasionally puerile displays could be scouted out: Tocqueville quotations about the virtues of America on placards lining the road leading to the campgrounds; a man in a George W. Bush mask being led around in chains by a dominatrix; a Guantanamo Camp offering the waterboarding experience to all comers; and an abundance of American flags, half flying the right way, the others upside-down. Yet for all this, there was little in the way of formal politics. Abiding by the mood of escapism, only a few Burners donned the paraphernalia of the Obama campaign. They were frowned upon by seasoned Burners, as if it were declassé to introduce mundane partisan politics into Burning Man's sacred cloisters.

What politics did exist were off the charts. Entheon Village, a klatch of latter-day hippies and New Agers, was a choice example. There I heard "The Secret History of the War on Drugs," a lecture delivered by Charles Shaw, who was introduced as a "regular contributor" to the Huffington Post (although he has posted on the site only twice). To a hundreds-strong audience, he delivered witless one-liners about the Bush administration (the predictable exception to the Burners' aversion to partisan politics) and wove a preposterous conspiracy theory that blamed every evil on, and attributed every power to, the American government. According to Mr. Shaw, the powers-that-be had hooked GIs in Vietnam on heroin to tamp down the risk of mutiny, and the Reagan administration had introduced crack to urban areas because the president "didn't really like black people."

In the course of the week, I returned to Entheon Village once more, seeking refuge from a sandstorm. During my first day at Entheon, I had overheard an organizer telling volunteers that their job was to "make the space more sacred." Sanctity had been otherwise in short supply at Burning Man, so I made my way past the encampment's lecture hall, past the inflatable Buddhist temple, past the "Sound Healing Yurt" to the God and Goddess Dome, where I took out my rosary -- my costume for most of the week was a Friar Tuck outfit -- and began to pray. When I opened my eyes, I found an erotic massage going on next to me. Apparently I had misunderstood the dome's name.

I exited, but not without a sense of revelation, one that was confirmed in a visit to the Relaxomatic Plushitorium -- a camp filled with recliners and settees, all of them crowded with bodies. There was also, when I went, a generous supply of In-and-Out burgers brought in from Reno for the occasion. On one side of me sat Dan, a Manhattan hedge-fund analyst and self-described conservative; on the other, a girl who gave her name as Orange, a California-based environmental consultant. These two -- one would think them diametrically opposed -- had nonetheless come together in the spirit of getting away from it all. Reluctant to discuss the outside world, they both seemed to find pleasure in the do-what-you-like libertinism of Burning Man and its separation from the outside world. Dan even noted with obvious pride that, three years ago, when Hurricane Katrina struck, few Burning Man revelers learned about the disaster unfolding on the Gulf until they left the desert.

The festival ended in the traditional way: with the ritual incineration of a four-story-high wicker man. As I watched the flames shoot up and consume the looming figure, I found myself standing next to a grotesquely muscular Slav dressed in a faux white fur coat. He periodically pushed a button on his dragon-inspired modified sedan, causing it to spurt an enormous plume of fire into the air. A female retinue loitered nearby, tittering endlessly. This was not a festival about deeper understanding or spiritual hokum. The pretense of a demonetized society notwithstanding, consumption was king at Burning Man. The gargantuan pyrotechnics, the drugs, the sex -- this was just wanton hedonism. Ordinary and not-so-ordinary people gave the finger to "the man," shirked responsibility and behaved recklessly.

And then it was over. Back in Reno, decompressing from the experience, I found that my hotel was filled with burned-out Burners plummeting back to reality. I overheard one girl in the lobby Starbucks having a phone conversation filled with worry about missed work. She began crying and between sobs said into her cellphone: "I don't want to lose my job."

The hotel was happy to host the Burners: A cocktail waitress told me that, despite their shabby appearance, they seemed to have more money to tip and gamble than the usual tourists. Money to burn, you might say.

Mr. Kavulla is a Phillips Foundation journalism fellow.
All I have to say is that the man is NOT made of wicker nor does he resemble wicker. I wonder if this bloke even bothered to watch the burn or do any significant amount of research.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122058209244302597.html[/quote]
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Damok
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Post by Damok » Wed Sep 10, 2008 3:45 pm

Toolmaker wrote:Here is an example of what "naughty" media does to our community.
I completely agree. I found the article to be extremely biased in nature and totally missing the essence of BM and clearly had extreme bias regarding the event before he even showed up.

As a media person, I find this deplorable and am currently working on a letter to the day editor of the WSJ (Not that they are likely to care much but bieng a member of the press, they may actually print it in the editorials section..

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Intubater69
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Post by Intubater69 » Wed Sep 10, 2008 4:29 pm

Toolmaker wrote:I had an entire duffel with my PRIMARY survival gear stolen from me when I was sleeping right next to it. This is attempted murder in my opinion.. real fuckin cool to steal someone friggin food and water when they are a "homeless' camper. Thankfully there are still a few real burners out there to help the ppl that the ORG volunteers screwed.

edited to add:

Also not cool to steal, deface, or burn the art of others. This is another trend that has continued to get worse.. this could be why there was less art this year.
Toolmaker, I personally am appalled that someone would do that, with you sleeping next to it no less!! WTF! This was my first burn, but through my 46 yrs of life have strove to adhere to many of the 10 principles that Burning Man promotes. What I really loved about camping in Kidsville was how everybody was very willing to help thine neighbors, no ? asked. I felt it was my duty and an honor to help out my fellow burner. After all, it is an extreme environment and survival could depend on it, as you mentioned. I'm from northern Michigan, and this philosophy was instilled upon me at an early age. Rest assured that I'm sure that I am one of MANY that would have been more then willing to make sure your loss was made up for, and if the perps caught, thoroughly dealt with in Thunderdome.
I get to drive the ambulance how fast?!!

SailMan

oaklandfunk
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Post by oaklandfunk » Tue Dec 16, 2008 1:52 pm

just as an FYI (glowstickgate not withstanding) Gate people only confiscate things at the gate that are NOT ALLOWED in the event: such as feathers(indian headdress attched or not), fireworks, plants,guns, unregistered mutant vehicles, and unticketed people. That information is readily avalible on the website. You dont have to give up your stuff/but you cant enter with it. The choice is and always has been yours. Go home , put your headress back and return to the event moop free or give up your stuff to the burnbarrel/trash can. Its not come flexing of muscle, its that those things destroy the event and ruin the playa.

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Elderberry
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Post by Elderberry » Tue Dec 16, 2008 3:26 pm

I actually thought that you could get special permission to bring in plants. (I read that somewhere in the rules.)

JK
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oaklandfunk
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Post by oaklandfunk » Thu Dec 18, 2008 12:05 pm

jkisha wrote:I actually thought that you could get special permission to bring in plants. (I read that somewhere in the rules.)

JK
Ive never heard of that and, although I dont know everything about the gate, I do know that dan dasman had a tree confiscated and left at the gate that he wanted to put up as a part of the oil derek instalation2 yrs ago, and if he couldnt figure out how to get special permission, my guess is that it doesnt exist.

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Elderberry
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Post by Elderberry » Thu Dec 18, 2008 1:00 pm

oaklandfunk wrote:
jkisha wrote:I actually thought that you could get special permission to bring in plants. (I read that somewhere in the rules.)

JK
Ive never heard of that and, although I dont know everything about the gate, I do know that dan dasman had a tree confiscated and left at the gate that he wanted to put up as a part of the oil derek instalation2 yrs ago, and if he couldnt figure out how to get special permission, my guess is that it doesnt exist.
I just went and did a search on the main site, and I can't find what I originally read about it; but it was there at one time. There were instructions on how to acclimate them before bringing them, which were 'better candidates', plans on how they would be cared for, how the plants were integral to your camp theme, etc.

Frankly, I think bringing plants would be a pain in the ass and personally would not do it. (actually, after reading the article I did think about how grass might be incorporated into the shower water purification system.)

And I did see some people with live grass there last year.

(I was wondering why they didn't do the final part of the art installation, thanks for the explanation.)

JK
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Toolmaker
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Post by Toolmaker » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:02 pm

I believe falk is the fella that gets/got an exception for Oasis dome due to a proven track record of being moop free. I don't know if they still bring them, you'll have to ask him. Ron was also part of the camp that had grass.. I think they gave up due to assclowns pissing on everything, again you'd have to ask him about it.
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Elderberry
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Post by Elderberry » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:15 pm

Toolmaker wrote:I believe falk is the fella that gets/got an exception for Oasis dome due to a proven track record of being moop free. I don't know if they still bring them, you'll have to ask him. Ron was also part of the camp that had grass.. I think they gave up due to assclowns pissing on everything, again you'd have to ask him about it.
I knew I read about an exception for plants somewhere. I just couldn't find it anywhere when I tried searching again.

JK
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wedeliver
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Post by wedeliver » Sat Dec 20, 2008 12:36 pm

jkisha wrote:
Toolmaker wrote:I believe falk is the fella that gets/got an exception for Oasis dome due to a proven track record of being moop free. I don't know if they still bring them, you'll have to ask him. Ron was also part of the camp that had grass.. I think they gave up due to assclowns pissing on everything, again you'd have to ask him about it.
I knew I read about an exception for plants somewhere. I just couldn't find it anywhere when I tried searching again.

JK
I did a search on "live plants" and got the following. I am not sure how they can enforce that. Some RV full timers have live plants growing in their RV's. They are not going to give up that 10 year old Philadendron. We almost got turned around because the fire wood I was bringing still had the fucking bark attached (time for a dog joke). But my son promised to not let the bark hit the playa.
LIVE PLANTS ON PLAYA

NO PLANTS AT BURNING MAN

Given the 2007 GREEN MAN theme, you might be tempted to bring plants to our event in the Black Rock Desert. Don’t.

Remember: Burning Man is probably the largest “Leave No Traceâ€
I'm a topless shirtcocking yahoo hippie

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Apollonaris Zeus
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Post by Apollonaris Zeus » Mon Jan 05, 2009 9:43 pm

mars wrote:
...the power of being a greeter...you can let every car know exactly what you want them to know about BRC.
Yeah, it's all about POWER isn't it

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bx1
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Post by bx1 » Fri Mar 06, 2009 6:11 am

Travis Kavulla of the Wall Street Journal wrote: Now it is an intricately planned 168-hour-long rave.
Another fine example that people will see what they want to see, and create what they expect...

Especially a reporter who wants to sell a story.
Braden aka BX1 aka -=B=-

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