Tent for next year

Ideas, advice, tips, and tricks regarding shelter, shade, tents, and camping. Yes, this includes RV's too.
User avatar
Princess Dammitt
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 9:09 pm
Location: San Francisco

Tent for next year

Post by Princess Dammitt » Tue Sep 21, 2004 3:07 pm

In a nutshell, the tent we used this year sucked.
I didn't know the tent had a mesh skylight when I ordered it and everything became coated with an inch of dust everyday. I had to perform contortionist maneuvers in order to move around inside. And one of the window tent poles broke.
So I am going to be the ultimate Princess and buy a *big* and worthy tent for next year.
Has anyone had any experience with this tent?: http://www.coleman.com/coleman/ColemanC ... d=9232A129
putty, monkey, zamboni, weasels.....check!

User avatar
primate
Posts: 34
Joined: Tue Sep 07, 2004 4:15 pm

Post by primate » Tue Sep 21, 2004 3:40 pm

My first year I used a small dome tent, and well it was small and sucked.
The next year I used that very tent, and it was the sh!t. I used it 3 more years with no problems at all. I didn't even use guy wires and it held up against the wind just fine. Then last year I got all ballsy and bought some huge 3 room dome tent. I failed to use guy wires on it, because I didn't have to with my old tent, well a wind storm came along and flattened that sucker like a pancake, it also broke all the fiber glass poles.
So this year, I bought new poles for it and took it out again, I made sure I tied it down real well and it did okay, but when I was taking it apart, I found that two of the fiber glass poles had snapped but because I had tied it down so well, the tent still held together.

The nice thing about the tent you are looking at is that it uses metal poles. Next year I am going back to that one. It doesn't have a bunch of fancy rooms, but it is solid as can be.

Hope that helps.
I came here to kick some ass and drink some Ten-high and I am almost out of Ten-high.

User avatar
Bob
Posts: 6748
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 10:00 am
Burning Since: 1986
Camp Name: Royaneh
Location: San Francisco
Contact:

Post by Bob » Tue Sep 21, 2004 6:49 pm

I'd guess that few off-the-shelf shelters, other than top-of-the-line expedition tents, are entirely suitable wrt dust and wind in open areas on the playa. Mountaineers often use snow blocks or stone circles to block the wind around a camp area.

However, I'd guess that any tent in fair shape, secured with 8" to 12" stakes, will work nicely if pitched downwind of vehicles or a windbreak fence extending up to 1/3 - 1/2 the tent height. The stronger winds comes from the southwest, mostly. Tarps, or short runs of plywood or other light board, can be pinned down to the ground on the windward side of vehicles as a skirt to keep much of the dust from blowing directly toward the tent area, or at least along the ground toward the tent doors.
Amazing desert structures & stuff: http://sites.google.com/site/potatotrap/

"Let us say I suggest you may be human." -- Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam

User avatar
PetsUntilEaten
Posts: 294
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2003 5:49 pm
Location: los angeles

Post by PetsUntilEaten » Tue Sep 21, 2004 7:55 pm

I've seen tents using that semi-accordian structure collapse quite often.

The tents using crossed thick metal poles seem to do better. I've got two tents I got from Sears on sale at the end of august - about $120-150 - 10ft x 10ft. - walk-in height - those have been with me 6 years on the playa. One of them (used as our kitchen) got messed up this year after a mouse ate up parts of it in storage - and I missed some of the holes during repairs - even then - it stayed up. I have yet another 20 x 10ft tent I got from CostCo for maybe $175 - That's my bedroom tent.

(if you really want to treat yourself - they have collapsable bed stands for queen inflatable mattresses under $60 - and I cover my packing boxes with fabric to use as night tables)

We use vehicles as a morning sun / wind break. That certainly does help.

The top vents I love - I know people who cover them - but I just pull a large piece of fabric over my whole bed. Its not so much dust really.

User avatar
Princess Dammitt
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 9:09 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by Princess Dammitt » Tue Sep 21, 2004 9:58 pm

PetsUntilEaten wrote:(if you really want to treat yourself - they have collapsable bed stands for queen inflatable mattresses under $60
I've seen those and automatically said "oooooh...want!".

I am mostly looking for a dust/wind storm resistant worthy tent that my husband can stand up in (he is 6'1") and I can hula hoop in if I wanted to. Suggestions are welcomed, especially links with images of tents you have and recommend.

I have plenty of metal stakes that I used on our dome tent and shade structure, so I am prepared there. (My campmates thought I was a bit overzealous with those until a random gust of wind went thru Wheeville and relocated someone's staked down shadestructure made up with metal pvc pipes)

Looks like on payday I should go get a Costco membership and check out their selection soon.
putty, monkey, zamboni, weasels.....check!

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Tue Sep 21, 2004 10:12 pm

I have a liftback tent for my SUV. I've gone on record as swearing by it and I still definitely feel that I got my money worth out of it. Been using it for the past three years.

Then again, I was mostly "settling" for a liftback tent and an air mattress in the back. This year I'm getting my yurt back, and I'm afraid that's going to spoil the hell out of me.

I won't recommend buying a yurt, even a small one, unless you're going to get much much more than Burn mileage out of it. They run into the thousands, it's just not worth it for buying for the Burn and storing it the rest of the year. But they last a long time and if you've got land, you can set it up. Or heck, even if you have a large back yard. Then it's worth it.

Another tent structure I've <b>never</b> heard bad things about on the Playa are tipis. If you're handy and have access to the poles, you can skin it over with billboard vinyls. Or you can shell out the several hundred and get the canvas covers. That's all most companies will sell you, they assume you'll cut your own poles.

Before I headed out to the Burn this year, I saw a Coleman tent being offered at my local GI Joe's for sale. It was a four-room, 250-square foot tent: a big middle "living room," a vestibule foyer, and two side rooms. I thought, "Ooooh, sexy! Me want!" but I didn't get it. The regular price was $250, sale price $180. Glad I didn't get it...I don't have to "settle" anymore...
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

User avatar
AntiM
Moderator
Posts: 20203
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2004 5:23 am
Burning Since: 2001
Camp Name: Anti M's Home for Wayward Art
Location: Wild, Wild West
Contact:

Post by AntiM » Wed Sep 22, 2004 8:32 am

We own three tents. All of them have mesh skylights. We beat the dust in two ways: first, leave off the rainfly and clamp on a large, thick cover to keep out the dust. Comforters or old curtains work well. Second, we always have our tent under some type of shade structure. Keeps the dust down and protects the tent from the wind.

I don't like our big Coleman, we track in more dust because it is big enough to stand in and takes up too much room in the shade structure. Our $20 cheapie is our loaner, no one has complained about dust in it so far using the cover/shade strategy. I like the "snug as a bug in a rug" feeling of our two person backpacker tent, although I can understand why some folks would hate it. We strip down, wipe off with baby wipes and crawl in relatively dust free. Sure we caught a layer of dust one afternoon while we were out; had the lighter cover on top instead of the heavy curtains. Once we made the switch, no more problems.

The little tent is 12 years old; originally bought it for motorcycle camping.

I guess the shade struture replaces the functions of the additional rooms in the larger tents.

User avatar
PetsUntilEaten
Posts: 294
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2003 5:49 pm
Location: los angeles

Post by PetsUntilEaten » Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:18 am

I searched Costco & Sears & couldn't find the exact tents I refered to.

Costco doesn't carry many tents, so I'd check online & call - then use a friend's membership. (Although I food shop at the Reno CostCo for their trays of large tomatoes, bluberries & pre-cooked tritip steak. The tomatoes always last for about two weeks & taste great - not organic great - but oh well)

• Costco did have this curiously designed tent (needs a wind break):

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.as ... th=111*293*

• Found these close to my tent construction & price on ebay
(sorry that these links will expire eventually):

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... RK:MEWA:IT

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... RK:MEWA:IT

• and then there's this!:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... RK:MEWA:IT

User avatar
PetsUntilEaten
Posts: 294
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2003 5:49 pm
Location: los angeles

Post by PetsUntilEaten » Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:38 am


User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:48 am

I agree, that last one was nice. It'd work great with this year's theme, too, especially if you jazz it up with a little glitter-glue and surround it with glowstick luminarias or flapping mylar windspinners or little fake mushrooms. And such a price!

My shelter's taken care of for the year so I'm sitting this dance out, but at $25 starting bid and no bids, go for it!
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

User avatar
Ohranje
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2004 12:47 pm
Location: San Francisco, CA
Contact:

Post by Ohranje » Wed Sep 22, 2004 2:05 pm

I had an awesome tent this year - and we remained virtually dust free in this tent.

Check out: http://www.mountainsports.com/mssearch. ... ail=058202

Basically it is a tent within the tent. We then added a tarp on the floor over the inside tent flaps - noting that the tent does not have a floor of it's own, a tarp is required. Then we added a piece of carpeting. We hung the inside sleeping area tent and then slapped a tarp across the top while also putting garbage bags over the inside tent's vent areas, while not sealing them but allowing them to breath still.

This tent never moved during the wind storms, and we only staked it down on the 4 corners. We kept the windows and vents closed when we were out and only opened them when the weather permitted.

We had a basically dust free sleeping area, and unlike our camp mates, never had to shake out our bedding.

This tent is well worth the cost - I love it - and it will be seeing many more burning man events.
Juicy Fruit Jim
The Information Fairy
Fairyland - by Playa Fairies
San Francisco, CA
www.playafairies.com
www.ohranje.com
2004 First Burn

thedrunkenmonkey
Posts: 40
Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2004 8:23 pm

Post by thedrunkenmonkey » Thu Sep 23, 2004 2:43 pm

I have a Eureka Equidome 6. It's got a mesh top that connects - but it also has a rainfly. Admittedly, after the burn, I found tons of dust inside, and all of the clothing and gear I had had a small amount of dust coating it...

but it was also underneath a Costco carport that had the sides staked down and a long tarp underneath to catch all of the dust from coming inside.

Friends who came into my tent said, "WHOA. You have NO dust in here." Even the guy who shared my carport never put the top on his tent - it too had a mesh top - and he never shook out his bedding, nor did he have to wash much when he got home.

Swingers' Lounge had a sweet setup with a swamp cooler at one end of their quonset-style structure, where the cooler kept going all day and most of the night. There was dust, to be sure, but the thing was, the swamp cooler kept pushing the dust OUT of the sealed sleeping area so it never had a chance to collect on peoples' gear.

Were I to assemble a dust-free environment, it'd be a half-tube, down with tarps sealing underneath, a powerful fan blowing a good 5 MPH wind from one end of the structure, set two feet above the playa on a platform with a staggered series of windbreaks.

Or I'd just get a dome tent without mesh panels anywhere and cover that with another tent.
BANANAPHONE!

User avatar
Dork
Posts: 2065
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2004 6:01 pm
Location: Las Vegas

Post by Dork » Thu Sep 23, 2004 3:35 pm

I didn't have that particular tent, but an older one of the same design. It was rock solid and very comfortable. I did get a fair amount of dust, but only because the zipper was hard to use and I left it open much of the time. It's GREAT being able to actually walk around and change clothes inside a tent! Also, the tall ceiling seemed to help keep it cooler than the little hot boxes.

Keep an eye out for cheap tents at garage sales - a lot of people are likely getting rid of theirs now that the season is mostly over or because they upgraded. Also, zippers that unzip themselves can be fixed by crimping the zipper pull with a pair of plyers. I got my tent for free because the previous owners thought it was beyond repair. Unfortunately I was a little over-zealous with the plyers and it's hard to pull now, but hopefully I can fix that for next year.

User avatar
theCryptofishist
Posts: 40313
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:28 am
Burning Since: 2017
Location: In Exile

Post by theCryptofishist » Thu Sep 23, 2004 4:11 pm

Dork wrote: Also, the tall ceiling seemed to help keep it cooler than the little hot boxes.
My experience as well, although it did mean that it rattled in the wind--and that's one of the things that frays my nerves.

Hotspur
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2003 6:40 pm

Post by Hotspur » Thu Sep 23, 2004 6:52 pm

I had a dome tent with a vented ceiling, and had dust problems.

I haven't decided if I'm just going to bring an extra sheet to cover everything inside with next year, or if I'm going to go the duct-tape and plastic-wrap route. I might do the former but also cover up the upwind-side vents -- some people have posted in the past that completely sealing your tent drastically increases the damage it takes in wind storms.

User avatar
Princess Dammitt
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 9:09 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by Princess Dammitt » Thu Sep 23, 2004 7:39 pm

Dork wrote:I did get a fair amount of dust, but only because the zipper was hard to use and I left it open much of the time. It's GREAT being able to actually walk around and change clothes inside a tent! Also, the tall ceiling seemed to help keep it cooler than the little hot boxes.
I was expecting the amount of dust we experienced this year. The sheet that I planned on bringing to toss over the sleeping bags during the day decided to stay home and play with the cats instead. Can't say I blamed it.
The big attraction to this style tent to me is the tall ceiling and it potientally being cooler than the previous tent.

Although the Fairy Palace tent is *very* tempting....I could store all of my tiaras in there ;)
putty, monkey, zamboni, weasels.....check!

congochris
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2004 1:27 am
Location: depends what day it is

Post by congochris » Fri Sep 24, 2004 6:16 pm

We bouught the same coleman tent princess dammit is considering, only the next size larger, from costco and took it out to the playa this year and it was utterly destroyed by the windstorms on Wednsday. It was staked down per the directions, with the small end facing the prevailing winds. Yet the winds broke one of the poles in 5 places, and anothr pole in 3 places, and bent them in a few more. I loved the tent at first, large and airy. I bought a carpet for door to try and keep some of the mud out. The problem I found with it was that you could not zip up the vents in the roof, only cover them with the rain fly, so even if you kept every entry/window zipped up to keep out the dust, it could still get in. Also the only ties to stake down the tent were attached to the rain fly, not the tent. There was no really good place to attach additional tie downs (which you would have to buy seperately) to the actual tent except in the corners. And unfortunately the place which need the additional support was in the middle, especially with such large areas of exposure

preburnkentucky
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 1:35 pm
Location: Louisville, Kentucky

Dome Set Up Time

Post by preburnkentucky » Mon Oct 11, 2004 5:35 pm

o.K. Another annoying newbie question.
How long does it take to setup one of those domes like
Tara recommends on her site?
Would prefer to have a larger structure than most tents offer
as a wlcoming space. Just don't want to need a large group
to set it up. Thinkg about an 8ft radius 3v 5/8.
Any and all thoughts appreciated.
Yes it is the 16th largest city in the United States!

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Tue Oct 12, 2004 12:10 am

Haven't built a dome in several years, so I'm out of practice...obviously, the more hands working on it, the less troublesome it is to put up but make sure everyone is working together as a team. If egos get in the way even putting up a goddamn umbrella can take hours and cause several grey hairs to materialize.

I'd say at least two or three people. This number is based on a skeleton crew to put up a 16' yurt.
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

dman
Posts: 90
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2003 2:16 pm
Location: Silly Valley

Post by dman » Tue Oct 12, 2004 11:05 am

Major hassles with domes include:

1) Fabrication. Lots of struts to cut, holes to drill - easier if you have access to a real shop, but doable with backyard tools. Figure 10 minutes fab time per strut, and a 5/8 3v takes 165 plus spares using a cutoff wheel, 12 ton hydraulic press & bench drill press.

2) Covering. Just about anything will do, the more opaque and lighter colored (facing out) the better, but lots of people seem perfectly happy cooking themselves inside domes covered with translucent army green parachutes, so YMMV. Single ply tarps are noisy in the wind unless secured really well. Custom cut and sewn coverings fit really well and can have low noise, but are either very expensive (thousands) or take a long time to make. We used laminated tarp-foil-tarp and were very happy with the results (low noise, low heat, low cost compared to "real" circus tent tarp), but it seemed to take forever to laminate, cut, hem, sew & strap the 105 triangles on our 5/8 3v. Didn't keep good track to give an estimate, but in retrospect an hour per triangle from start to finish is a good ballpark.

3) Assembly. Top down is easiest (ground level work, only 1 assembly/tighten for each bolt), but requires a hoist (easily made using some square channel, a hand winch & some guy-lines). Figure about 20 total person hours using at least 2 and preferably 4-5 people (about 16 hours for dome assembly and 4 for covering tie-down on ours). If you have enough people you can devote one person to supervisor, one to handle materials layout and three to pulling the pieces together and bolting them. Using 4-5 people means the job takes about 4-5 hours (this is for a relatively inexperienced crew, hungover, in the playa sun).

Great things about domes:

1) A great fit for the playa in terms of aesthetics, IMHO.

2) Very roomy for the amount of material needed. The high ceilings shed heat well and a 5/8 3v will have more or less vertical walls for about half the overall height, so nearly every bit of floorspace is usable.

3) Very strong; several hammocks, hundreds of pounds of people hanging/swinging, no problem, but my rocket-scientist & PhD campmates wouldn't let me hang the trampoline inside this year (woosies!)

4) They shed wind very well (batten them down and you'll be thinking "what dust storm?") and rain, too, if the covering is designed for that.

5) You can get really creative once you get the hang (or do the math) on perturbing the struts to make doorways or extensions.

In summation, if all you want is shade there are far easier ways to get it (e.g. well-secured pole awnings), but domes have advantages in other areas you may find desirable enough to offset the cost/effort.

Here's a pic.

Best of luck whatever you decide to do!
"Yes, but is it art?" "No, Art is over there, on the couch."

User avatar
Blenderhead
Posts: 219
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2003 10:34 am
Location: San Francisco

Post by Blenderhead » Wed Oct 13, 2004 1:36 pm

The ceiling vent of the Eddie Bauer 6-man, 2-room tent (> $100 on ebay) zips closed. Problem solved.

(unless your gf zips the sucker open without knocking the dust off the top of the tent first - then, you get a nice dust shower. Buh.)

User avatar
Silver 2
Posts: 232
Joined: Thu May 20, 2004 4:27 pm
Location: DC/Northern VA

Post by Silver 2 » Wed Oct 13, 2004 7:08 pm

Do not buy a Wenzel tent! THe door zippers suck hard. The tent I bought in the spring is now at the landfill. I used it for 12 nights of camping (7 at Burning Man) and by Sunday night at Burning Man I had one (out of three) working doors and that one was iffy. A friend at PDF (East coast regional) had a Wenzel with one door and it went into the trash after four nights. Again it was the door zippers, on Monday morning I was making breakfast went I heard the plaintive voice 'Silver; can you get us out of here?' I had to use the vice-grips that I use to get re-bar out of the ground.
I like playing with fire.

User avatar
Princess Dammitt
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2004 9:09 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by Princess Dammitt » Fri Oct 15, 2004 12:35 pm

Silver 2 wrote:Do not buy a Wenzel tent!
I can vouch for this. That is the brand of the tent we brought this year and we experienced the same problems.
I am kind of nervous about Eddie Bauer tents though, most of the reviews I've read online were not that great.
putty, monkey, zamboni, weasels.....check!

User avatar
froggy
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:29 pm
Location: Cleveland, OH
Contact:

Post by froggy » Thu Oct 21, 2004 12:55 pm

diane o'thirst wrote:I have a liftback tent for my SUV. I've gone on record as swearing by it and I still definitely feel that I got my money worth out of it. Been using it for the past three years.
Just curious, what kind of SUV do you have?

User avatar
diane o'thirst
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:04 pm
Location: Eugene, OR
Contact:

Post by diane o'thirst » Thu Oct 21, 2004 2:17 pm

"Just curious, what kind of SUV do you have?"

Mazda Navajo. She's been dubbed Nephthys Navajo. How's that for multi-cultural? ;D
Got her back in '91, just passed 370,000 miles on the odometer. Not the biggest out there but that means better mileage and I don't need a Tankigator. Those damn things can't haul worth a damn, for all their size, they're only good for scaring sedans and coupes and pissing off environmentalists.
I went on a grocery run to Reno in one a couple years ago; we needed to feed sixty people for a week in our camp, and guess what? Groceries for sixty people for a week only just barely fit in that big ostentatious monster! And I can get a whole camp packed on and in my Navajo, including the water jugs. Nice lines, agile, 20-foot turn radius, nice dependable machine.
[url=http://tinyurl.com/245sagf][img]http://tinyurl.com/2bbr28j/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/23753ws][img]http://tinyurl.com/2auqebj/.gif[/img][/url][url=http://tinyurl.com/m4y82q][img]http://tinyurl.com/l56rdn/.gif[/img][/url]

jbelson
Posts: 312
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 4:41 pm
Location: lost Angeles

Post by jbelson » Fri Oct 22, 2004 5:40 pm

ONE INGENIOUS idea i saw was someone with their dome tent inside of a 10'x20' car port that had 3 of the sides covered. Not only was the tent shaded in the morning, it had a wind barrier, and a nice little shaded kick-back area right out the front door.
"I gotta have more cowbell"
Bruce dickenson, legendary rock producer

Dragon
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 11:43 am

Post by Dragon » Wed Nov 03, 2004 11:51 am

After our first year in a mesh top tent, my partner and I did some extensive searching/comparison and decided on the Eureka Sunrise XT. It's a Large two pole Dome tent ~10'x12' and 6' Tall in the middle. This tent has worked great for us the last three years and with no additional support (other then rebar to stake it down) has survived all of the windstorms the last three years - Including this last years hellish winds.
We also love this tent because it's got a zippered divider down the middle and two off-set doors so we put all of our bedding on one side of the divide and use the other side as our entryway. Really keeps the dust down from the bed area.
Also, we've been bringing out carpet remenants the last two years (find em on Craigslist). We use one 10'x10' in our Shade structure (QuickShade) and the other 10'10' for our tent. Works great and very comfortable.

--D

User avatar
shitmouse
Posts: 486
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2003 8:31 am
Location: sf

Post by shitmouse » Sat Dec 04, 2004 12:04 pm

what bob said.

i have brought a *piece of shit* coleman "super-deer-killin'-tent" that seats 15 people. we have not had any probs other than zipper issues which can be lubed anbd dealt with.

-(without reading all the posts) one of the biggest gains in fighting back the playa winds in their destructive formatt is to ALWAYS nestle yor tent between an L shape between your cars/trucks. let them do all the work.
i have brought my POS coleman out there for 3 years, and it still stands.
-b
=-=-= \<>/ =-=-=

User avatar
CAPSLOCK
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 7:24 am
Location: Norway
Contact:

Post by CAPSLOCK » Tue Dec 14, 2004 10:59 am

But what's the best tent for to use on the Playa to ceep the dust out?
My tent this year was no good! The ziper broke and it was filled with playa dust that got in throug the ventilation on the thent,

User avatar
CAPSLOCK
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 7:24 am
Location: Norway
Contact:

Post by CAPSLOCK » Tue Dec 14, 2004 11:02 am

Sorry, spelling erorr, keep not ceep. Ho ho ho.

CAPSLOCK :oops:

Post Reply

Return to “Building Camps & Villages”